Probiotics | How Gut Health Affects the Brain | Mental Benefits of Probiotics- Thomas DeLauer

Probiotics | How Gut Health Affects the Brain | Mental Benefits of Probiotics- Thomas DeLauer

Probiotics | How Gut Health Affects the Brain | Mental Benefits of Probiotics- Thomas DeLauer

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we are outnumbered by foreign invaders in our bodies they’re not really foreign invaders back they’re very welcome guests what I’m talking about is our gut bacteria I’m talking about the bacteria that has a symbiotic relationship with us that lives inside our guts in fact here’s what’s kind of interesting it used to be believed that we had approximately 100 trillion bacteria in our bodies rehearses 10 trillion human cells if you do the math on that it’s kind of scary we have more of an external bacteria in our bodies than we do our own intrinsic human cells now further research has now proven that it’s a little bit different than that we have more like 40 trillion bacteria versus 20 to 30 trillion human cells still we’re outnumbered even with modern research we see that we have more bacteria in our bodies than we do human cells so why is it that we focus more on what is happening inherently with our bodies and what’s happening in this system of cells but we’re not as concerned with what’s happening with this wonderful symbiotic relationship of bacteria that’s in our guts and in our bodies that dictates a lot of what happens in our bodies well probably has something to do with the fact that it’s newer science and it’s just not out there yet so the purpose of this video is to help you understand the relationship between the bacteria in your body and how your brain actually functions now I’ve done videos on what’s called the gut brain access and the enteric nervous system before okay those are good videos to talk about how the gut actually affects emotion and things like that and that’s wonderful but what I want to talk about today is literally more the electrical system you say we found through recent research that literally the individual bacterias within our guts can send specific electrical signals to our brain that tell us to do certain things or tell us to feel a certain way they’re called microbes okay in these microbes send electrical signals now if you’ve ever seen any of that National Geographic footage or some really cool footage of those blue lights that wash up on shore well like you see like a coastal region we’ll have like this crazy group of waves that has blue lights in it maybe you’ve seen it maybe you haven’t but basically what that means is you’ve got this egg bacteria that’s in the ocean and this bacteria in the ocean is emitting a blue light and it’s sort of a wonder of the world like everyone’s fascinated by it the fact is bacteria emit energy man it does in the ocean and in our bodies – and this energy that it emits can actually send a signal to our brain and it does it through a central nervous system superhighway known as the vagus nerve the vagus nerve connects the intestinal tract up to the brain and without the vagus nerve we can’t have a lot of this process happening so it all comes down to our central nervous system and the ability for the bacteria to actually produce sort of a electricity now let’s talk about some science here so this all makes sense I’m gonna reference two big studies and I’m gonna break them down a little bit more detailed so it all makes sense the first one that I want to look at is one that was conducted at UCLA and this is one of the first studies that actually proved that there was a connection between the gut bacteria and the brain what this study looked at was subjects that consumed a probiotic rich yogurt and then wanted to see if there was going to be any kind of change in brain activity in both a rested state and in an emotional response state meaning how did their brain activity change when they were subjected to any kind of emotional stimulus so what they did is they had the women break up into three groups they had one group consume a yogurt which was rich in probiotics they had one group received just a dairy product that didn’t have any probiotics and then they had another group just be a placebo group so no yogurt no dairy at all okay and what they did is they had them consume this for a period of time and then at the end of the time period they did an fMRI scan they did a magnetic resonance imaging scan so they took a look at their brain activity it was pretty fascinating so what they found at the end of the study is that the group that consumed probiotic rich yogurt had a decrease in the activity of the brain area known as the insula now the insula is an area of the brain that dictates our response to body sensations now you might be wondering why is this good like why would we actually want to decrease brain activity in a specific area well when it comes down to body sensation we don’t always want to be jumpy I want you to use like a military sniper for example like a sniper doesn’t want to be jumpy right he doesn’t want to be trigger-happy he doesn’t want to just get scared and then pull the trigger well we don’t really want that in everyday life either we don’t want to be over reactive to our body sensations if someone bumps into you you don’t want to freak out and jump out of your skin and punch them in the face you want to be able to control that so when we have a decrease in activity level to the insula it means that we’re more calm more more cool were more collected now what they found is that the group that consumed dairy with no probiotics and the placebo group had zero change in fact they actually had an increase in activity when there is an emotional stimulus meaning that they were more reactive what they also found is that the probiotic group had an increase in connectivity activity between what is called the periaqueductal gray matter and the prefrontal cortex sounds like a lot of Greek basically what that means is they had more communication between our good old-fashioned innate brain and our prefrontal cortex as we evolved as humans we are developing more of a prefrontal cortex which means we’re utilizing more of our logical brain which means we’re using a little bit less of our emotional instinctual brain but what this connectivity increased means is that with probiotics and with good bacteria in our gut we had more of an ability of our brain to communicate within itself so our emotional part of our brain was able to communicate with our prefrontal cortex more meaning we were able to have an emotional response that was true and emotional but be able to communicate it to our prefrontal cortex to make a true logical decision so combining logic and emotion in the best possible ways was made possible by introducing the right forms of lactobacillus bacteria well this next study sums up what I was talking about earlier in this video ok the microbes that send the specific electrical activity to the brain this study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in the United States of America this study took a look at the vagus nerve and what would happen if the vagus nerve didn’t exist so what they did is they gave test subjects in this case it was mice and they gave these mice a specific kind of probiotic in this case I think they gave them lactobacillus rhamnosus which is a very common lactobacillus very common bacterium and what they found was that if the vagus nerve did not exist there was no change in brain activity in relation to gut bacteria so we already knew that there was a central nervous system connection between the gut and the brain but what we didn’t realize was that if that means superhighway was cut the gut no longer had the ability to communicate with the brain the reason this is so fascinating is because it tells us how closely tied in our gut bacteria is to our brain function like truly if we don’t have the central nervous system working in tandem with the bacteria our brain won’t feel right so what they did is they took a look at gabba gabba is known as gamma-aminobutyric acid and gaba is what allows us to feel sort of calm you see we have a gaba and we have glutamate we always want to slightly be skewed towards the gaba side it means again we’re calm we’re cool we’re collected we have our act together so when l rhamnosus was added into the equation they found that there was a change in gaba increases in GABA levels okay so they added this bacteria into the gut okay they gave them this bacteria they notice their GABA levels went up quite a bit calmer mice more calm cool collected mice when the vagus nerve was severed okay I know this is harsh and kind of barbaric but I’m just referencing the study here I didn’t do it personally they found that there was no change in gaba even when the probiotics were at it so they could add this bacteria and it may change the gut bacteria and how much is there but it had no change on the brain so we’re just adding this bacteria with no change to the body whatsoever again why do I get so excited about this because it proves literally proves but if you’re not taking care of your gut and you’re not taking the right measures to improve your gut health that you are not going to ever change your brain you’re not gonna be able to change the way you think not gonna be change the way you feel not gonna change the way you act so the purpose of this video is just to sum it up it’s just to teach you a little bit more about how we can send an electrical signal from our gut to our brain and hopefully inspire you to take a new look at gut health and stop eating what you’re eating now and make a shift to really take care of the little bacterial friends that are living inside of us as always make sure you keep it locked in here on my channel if you have ideas of those future videos you know where to put them see you soon

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Probiotics | How Gut Health Affects the Brain | Mental Benefits of Probiotics- Thomas DeLauer…
We are outnumbered by foreign invaders in our bodies. Alright, they’re not really foreign invaders. In fact, they’re very welcomed guests. What I’m talking about is our gut bacteria. I’m talking about the bacteria that has a symbiotic relationship with us that lives inside our guts.

In fact, here’s what’s kind of interesting. It used to be believed that we had approximately 100 trillion bacteria in our bodies versus 10 trillion human cells. If you do the math on that, it’s kind of scary. We have more of an external bacteria in our bodies than we do our own intrinsic human cells.

Now, further research has now proven that it’s a little bit different than that. We have more like 40 trillion bacteria versus 20-30 trillion human cells. Still, we’re outnumbered. Even with modern research, we see that we have more bacteria in our bodies than we do human cells. So why is it that we focus more on what is happening inherently with our bodies and what’s happening in this system of cells, but we’re not as concerned with what’s happening with this wonderful symbiotic relationship of bacteria that’s in our guts and in our bodies that dictates a lot of what happens in our bodies?

Well, it probably has something to do with the fact that it’s newer science and it’s just not out there yet. So the purpose of this video is to help you understand the relationship between the bacteria in your body and how your brain actually functions.

Now, I’ve done videos on what’s called the gut-brain axis in the enteric nervous system before. Those are good videos to talk about how the gut actually affects emotion and things like that. And that’s wonderful. But what I want to talk about today is literally more the electrical system.

You see, we found through recent research that literally the individual bacterias within our guts can send specific electrical signals to our brain that tell us to do certain things or tell us to feel a certain way. They’re called microbes, okay, and these microbes send electrical signals.

Now, if you’ve ever seen any of that National Geographic footage or some really cool footage of those blue lights that wash up on shore … You see a coastal region will have this crazy group of waves that has blue lights in it. Maybe you’ve seen it, maybe you haven’t, but basically what that means is you’ve got this bacteria that’s in the ocean. And this bacteria in the ocean is emitting a blue light. And it’s sort of a wonder of the world. Everyone’s fascinated by it.

The fact is, bacteria emit energy. It does in the ocean and it does it in our bodies, too. And this energy that it emits can actually send a signal to our brain. And it does it through a central nervous system superhighway known as the vagus nerve. The vagus nerve connects the intestinal tract up to the brain, and without the vagus nerve, we can’t have a lot of this process happening. So it all comes down to our central nervous system and the ability for the bacteria to actually produce sort of an electricity.

Now let’s talk about some science here so this all makes sense. I’m going to reference two big studies and I’m going to break them down in a little bit more detail so it all makes sense.

References:
1) Wenner, M. (2007, November 30). Humans Carry More Bacterial Cells than Human Ones. Retrieved from

2) How Probiotics Can Be Good for Your Brain. (n.d.). Retrieved from

3) Bravo JA , et al. (n.d.). Ingestion of Lactobacillus strain regulates emotional behavior and central GABA receptor expression in a mouse via the vagus nerve. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from

4) Champeau, R. (n.d.). Changing gut bacteria through diet affects brain function, UCLA study shows. Retrieved from

5) Probiotic, Prebiotic, and Brain Development. (n.d.). Retrieved from

6)

7) Sender R , et al. (n.d.). Revised Estimates for the Number of Human and Bacteria Cells in the Body. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from

8) Tillisch K , et al. (n.d.). Consumption of fermented milk product with probiotic modulates brain activity. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from

9) %2900292-8/abstract

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