Probiotics Guide: How to Pick the Right Probiotic- Gut Bacteria Overview | Thomas DeLauer

Probiotics Guide: How to Pick the Right Probiotic- Gut Bacteria Overview | Thomas DeLauer

Probiotics Guide: How to Pick the Right Probiotic- Gut Bacteria Overview | Thomas DeLauer

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I want to give you the breakdown and a study guide to help you understand what probiotics you should really be looking for it’s been a popular question that’s been coming up and I want to address it and give you the science and give you the research and one of the probiotic strains and i’ma talk about today is the most researched probiotic strain that exists a date with over a thousand studies backing it up and over thirty years of research so I’m gonna talk about that one and I’m also going to talk about another one that is extremely extremely popular I’m not talking about brands I’m talking about strains this isn’t any kind of pitch or anything this is literally talking about the different strains of probiotic and you can find them on any label so it’s going to help you understand what you should be looking for but also understanding the general harmony of the gut biome and how it affects our immune system if you haven’t already go ahead and hit that subscribe button so you can see whenever I post a video or go live and also make sure you turn on notifications you never ever miss a beat when it comes down to this channel okay so let’s start with L rhamnosus lol what yeah L rhamnosus is the most popular most researched strain of probiotic that is out there like I said with over a thousand studies behind it and over 30 years of research so L rhamnosus is a very specific type of lactobacillus okay and it’s been shown to do a lot of different things within the body but in order to understand what lactobacillus rhamnosus does i want to explain a very important cardinal rule a cardinal educational foundation when it comes down to understanding probiotics in the gut biome in general it’s called competitive adhesion you see whenever anything bad passes through your body we’re talking about a mold we’re talking about a pathogen bad bacteria whatever you name it as it passes through your body and it passes through your intestinal tract passing through your digestive system it has to latch on to a cell before it can ever cause a problem so in an unidentified unit we’ll attach to the cell and then it will trigger macrophages or white blood cells to come on and do their trick and do their whole thing trigger inflammation and you get sick you go through the ropes bla bla bla bla bla okay but if we have a situation where a bad pathogen doesn’t have the ability to latch onto the cell in the first place we don’t get sick we don’t have an immune response so how is this possible sounds like it’s way too good to be true well when we have good bacteria in the gut what ends up happening is these good bacteria latch on to the cell for us you see what we have to remember is good bacteria is still a foreign bacteria it’s still another living being inside of us as a living being so although it’s supposed to be there it’s kind of not supposed to be there it’s sort of like kind of those birds that sit on top of a rhino or a hippo it’s like they’re not born with those birds on them they also play a critical role in the survival of the hippo or the rhino so what ends up happening is these good bacteria latch onto the cell and they occupy the spaces where the bad bacteria normally would try to bind so that’s exactly why if you have more good bacteria than bad bacteria you’re in a situation where the good bacteria will always prevent bad bacteria from making you sick so that is exactly why they say that your immune system starts in your gut and if you’re constantly using hand sanitizers you’re constantly eating foods that destroy your got the bacteria anyway I digress that’s gonna make it a big problem right so what we want to look for is we want to look for probiotics that actually occupy our digestive system and allow this to happen now l remotest has been proven in multiple studies to do this but Eleanor osis also has another component to it that allows it to boost the immune system through other Pro in anti inflammatory pathways so it’s not just something that can occupy that digestive system it’s actually been proven to boost our immune system through other pathways as well so that’s talking about the immune system a little bit but what about constipation what about diarrhea and stuff like that I want to address this because this is something that I think is a common misconception probiotics don’t really have this huge effect on constipation or diarrhea or IBS or anything like that I’ll be totally honest the gut bacteria is more so there to have this kind of symbiotic relationship with us that allows us to not get as sick and allows our brain to communicate with our gut and allows our nervous system to do things it does have an effective digestion but that’s a lot more of an enzymatic function a lot more of a lipase function a bile salt production thing it’s a little bit of a different ballgame however when it comes down to L rhamnosus it’s a specific strain that does have the ability to stimulate not only the immune system but it also stimulates the production of the mucus that lines our gut if we have the right amount of mucus that lines are good it makes it so that we can digest food and not have any inflammatory bowel diseases that means not getting irritable bowel not getting that inflammation that causes diarrhea and constipation so L gnosis is proven to do that in a pretty significant way in fact when we’re talking about overall digestion and colonization and the colon and overall constipation diary in the first place let’s talk about one particular study so this study was published in the Journal of digestive diseases in science and it took a look at 76 subjects and what they did is they gave these 76 subjects a particular strain of lactobacillus rhamnosus in this case it was lactobacillus G G so what they did is they gave it to the subjects and then they measured their fecal matter later on I know it sounds a little bit gross but what they found is that later on 86 percent of the individuals that took in the lactobacillus rhamnosus ended up having it in their feces that may sound like a bad thing it’s actually a good thing it indicated that L rhamnosus was able to colonize within the colon now here’s where it gets even cooler some of those test subjects were given antibiotics the L rhamnosus still survived and was still present in the feces even when taken with an antibiotic that is powerful normally antibiotics wipe out good bacteria and pack bacteria that’s why you feel so crappy after you take them but in this case lactobacillus rhamnosus or lactobacillus gg actually survived even in the presence of antibiotics went all the way through colonized in the small and large intestine allowing us to produce the right gut mucosal layer that we need to truly feel healthy that alone is very powerful so now let’s talk about another popular one that you’ve probably seen and this one is known as acidophilus another strain of lactobacillus here’s what’s interesting acidophilus has been touted for years for decades as the most popular best bacteria that you can be taking in why probably because a lot of the yogurt companies touted it way back when my mom used to always tell me that I needed to take acidophilus she told me that as a kid and she wasn’t wrong the thing was back in the day the studies had concluded that because acidophilus colonized so fast it was really good so in theory when we look at how acidophilus works we take it in and it grows really fast in our stomach grows really fast in our gut so that means when we were measuring it and scientists were looking at it they were blown away they’re like wow this is a really inexpensive cheap probiotic that grows fast in the gut and we can measure it within minutes it’s growing but what we didn’t look at was that that rampant growth was definitely not a good thing it’s like a city growing too fast for the economy it seems really good but then you reach a point where it washes out everything else so this acidophilus grows so fast that it crowds out all the other good bacteria remember we have hundreds thousands hundreds of thousands of different strains of bacteria in our gut and when acidophilus is taking over all the other good ones too it’s got a little bit of a monopoly on our body so definitely not a good thing but also crowds out the bacteria that ultimately creates the short chain fatty-acids that support our digestive system so this means it can make it harder to lose weight it can make it harder to digest food and make it harder to go to the bathroom simply because you’re trying to get too much of a good thing now the other thing we have to look at is that acidophilus ends up crowding out a lot of the more active bacteria that actually promote our immune system you see acidophilus is not very good when it comes to the immune system in fact it’s actually pro-inflammatory so first when you first start looking in acidophilus it seems like a good thing because a little bit of pro-inflammatory response is a good thing triggering your immune system just enough to fight off bad bacteria but when it takes over and you have this plethora of it you have a pro-inflammatory response in your body that is triggering more inflammation crowding out good bacteria and crowding out the short chain fatty acids that ultimately create a healthy gut environment so what do you want to look for when you’re looking at a probiotic the short answer is go for what is researched you want to be looking for lactobacillus rhamnosus you want to be looking for large amounts of it so it can colonize within your gut if you’re looking at a probiotic and it has a lot of acidophilus in it you know that it’s a cheap filler acidophilus is cheap okay a lot of strains of acidophilus are cheap and they’re old school science so it’s probably some marketer that’s creating a lot of stuff to try to go ahead and sell you a cheap product now again this is all about the breakdown and what you need to understand probiotics if you like these videos I’ll do a lot more of them I love getting into the gut biome I love talking about the bacteria in the body because honestly it is what makes the world go round so as always to keep it walking here in my channel I’ll see you in the next one

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Probiotics Guide: How to Pick the Right Probiotic- Gut Bacteria Overview | Thomas DeLauer

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Probiotics Guide: How to Pick the Right Probiotic- Gut Bacteria Overview | Thomas DeLauer… I want to give you the breakdown and a study guide to help you understand what probiotics you should really be looking for. It’s been a popular question that’s been coming up and I want to address it and give you the signs and give you the research, and one of the probiotic strains I’m going to talk about today is the most researched probiotic strain that exists to date. There have been over 1,000 studies backing it up in over 30 years of research. So I’m going to talk about that one and I’m also going to talk about another one that is extremely, extremely popular. Now I’m not talking about brands, I’m talking about strains. This isn’t any kind of pitch or anything, this is literally talking about the different strains of probiotic and you can find them on any label. So it’s going to help you understand what you should be looking for, but also understanding the general harmony of the gut biome and how it effects our immune system.

If you haven’t already, go ahead and hit that subscribe button so you can see whenever I post a video or go live, and also make sure you turn on notifications so you never, ever miss a beat when it comes down to this channel.

Okay, so let’s start with L. rhamnosus. Lol what? Yeah, L. rhamnosus is the most popular, most researched strain of probiotic that is out there, like I said, with over 1,000 studies behind it and over 30 years of research. So L. rhamnosus is a very specific type of lactobacillus, and it’s been shown to do a lot of different things within the body, but in order to understand what Lactobacillus rhamnosus does, I want to explain to you a very important cardinal rule, a cardinal educational foundation when it comes down to understanding probiotics and the gut biome in general. It’s called competitive adhesion.

You see, whenever anything bad passes through your body, we’re talking about a mold, we’re talking about a pathogen, bad bacteria, whatever, you name it, as it passes through your body and passes through your intestinal track, passes through your digestive system, it has to latch onto a cell before it can ever cause a problem. So, in an unideal world what’ll happen is that mold or that pathogen will attach to the cell and then it will trigger macrophages, or white blood cells, to come on and do their trick and do their whole thing, trigger inflammation, and you get sick, you go through the ropes, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. Okay, but if we have a situation where a bad pathogen doesn’t have the ability to latch on to the cell in the first place, we don’t get sick, we don’t have an immune response. So how is this possible? Sounds like it’s way too good to be true.

Well when we have good bacteria in the gut, what ends up happening is these good bacteria will latch on to the cell for us. See what we have to remember is good bacteria is still a foreign bacteria, it’s still another living being inside of us as a living being. So although it’s supposed to be there, it’s kind of not supposed to be there. It’s sort of like those birds that sit on top of a rhino or a hippo. It’s like they’re not born with those birds on them, they also play a critical role in the survival of the hippo or the rhino. So what ends up happening is the good bacteria latch onto the cell and then occupy the spaces where the bad bacteria normally would try to bind. So that’s exactly why, if you have more good bacteria than bad bacteria, you’re in a situation where the good bacteria will always prevent bad bacteria from making you sick. So that is exactly why they say that you’re immune system starts in your gut, and if you’re constantly using hand sanitizers or you’re constantly heating foods that destroy your gut bacteria, anyway, I digress, that’s going to make it a big problem, right?

References:
1) L. rhamnosus – A common probiotic strain – Humarian. (2017, August 26). Retrieved from

2) Lactobacillus Rhamnosus Beneficial Bacteria. (2016, December 3). Retrieved from

3) Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, AKA “LGG”, Has Many Health Benefits. (n.d.). Retrieved from

4) New research sheds light on how popular probiotic benefits the gut. (2018, May 22). Retrieved from

5)

6) Goldin BR , et al. (n.d.). Survival of Lactobacillus species (strain GG) in human gastrointestinal tract. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from 6

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