Overtraining: The Effect on Hormones & Testosterone- Thomas DeLauer

Overtraining: The Effect on Hormones & Testosterone- Thomas DeLauer

Overtraining: The Effect on Hormones & Testosterone- Thomas DeLauer

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when we workout we’re causing stress in our bodies that’s a given everyone has said that but what we want to understand is how this stress can lead to overtraining and how this overtraining can lead to diminished hormone function and we know how important hormones are okay things like testosterone obviously play a critical factor in how much body fat we accumulate how much body fat we burn and overall how much muscle we build so now there are some direct links with overtraining and testosterone decline so let’s dive into the science and let’s understand if you’re truly overtraining hey if you haven’t already I want to make sure that you’ve hit that subscribe button so you can learn all the ins and outs of nutrition exercise keto fasting and you name it and if you’re already a subscriber hit that little bell so you can turn on notifications alright so first up we have to understand what the symptoms of overtraining are and the problem is they’re a little bit vague because they hit everyone a little bit different but in general we’re talking serious serious fatigue then we’re also talking sleeplessness when you’re overtraining you are in a situation where your catecholamines like your adrenaline your other fight-or-flight hormones are skyrocketing meaning you don’t sleep very well but you’re also gonna find yourself in a situation where you’re getting sick a lot okay you’re not able to recover and also when you don’t recover you have declines in performance so if you’re feeling like you’re at a plateau there’s a very good chance you’re overtraining well let me rephrase that no matter who you are there’s a good chance you’re overtraining because it doesn’t take much but the big factor here is testosterone okay what kind of effect does truly overtraining and distress have on testosterone production in not only men but women too of course it’s gonna have a bigger impact on men because we’re driven a little bit more by testosterone but it still applies to both genders now when we look at the science it’s easy to think that it could be the cytokine hypothesis now the cytokine hypothesis shows that whenever you train hard or whenever you workout or whenever you workout for a long period of time without adequate rest or recovery you end up in a situation where you have vast amounts of interleukins that enter the body or are produced so we’re talking interleukin 1 interleaving 3 5 6 10 15 all these interleukins which trigger specific inflammatory responses within the body we have to remember with training we want inflammation inflammation is what heals us and recovers us but if it happens too much it takes energy away from rest of the body so the cytokine hypothesis says that testosterone is in a decrease simply because our body is focused on healing specific things and when you’re under stress it makes no sense for your body to focus energy on testosterone production for procreation it just doesn’t make sense why on earth when your body try to encourage you to produce more children when you are in a time of stress but we also have to wonder which came first the chicken or the egg is testosterone decreasing because we’re overtraining or are we getting fatigued and stressed out and we’re triggering ourselves to work out a little bit different and have different stress levels and that’s causing testosterone to decrease so what’s really came first did we already have the decrease in testosterone or whatever well that’s where we have to start looking at some of the science so this first study that I want to look at was published in the British Medical Journal and it took a look at a large group of rugby players and what they wanted to find out was the correlation between testosterone production fitness level and exhaustion they wanted to find if rugby players were specifically more exhausted than other rugby players if they had differences in testosterone so what they did is they factored in how their testosterone levels correlated specifically with their tiredness so what they found with this study is that 25% of the rugby players that were super super exhausted ended up having 30% lower levels of testosterone but again it brings us back to which came first the chicken or the egg are they tired because they had low testosterone or do they have low testosterone because they’re not really active the way that they should be it’s kind of tough and the problem is that studies pretty subjective because we’re not really looking at the facts we’re looking at tiredness so we look at another study to take it one step further this study was published in the journal of fertility and sterility and it took a look at test subjects that were endurance athletes and what they did is they broke them into an overtraining group in a non overtraining group an overtraining group was simply classified as doing the same activity at the same intensity but just double the amount and what they did is they measured their testosterone levels and also they tested their semen to see their actual sperm count and they did this before they began exercise immediately after exercise and in three months after overtraining and what they found was absolutely astonishing the holts word that the group that was over trained ended up having a whopping decrease in testosterone by 39 percent but not only that they had a decrease in sperm count by 43 percent all in conjunction with a forty eight percent increase in cortisol now we get into the fun stuff why is this actually happening why is testosterone truly decreasing when we are over trained well one of the main things is something known as a corticotropin-releasing hormone you see when we have high amounts of corticotropin releasing hormones it triggers our body to produce more glucocorticoids and corticosteroids within the body that simply means that our body is releasing more cortisol and other catecholamines that could be stress inducing so what’s actually happening well this corticotropin-releasing hormone stops the production of luteinizing hormone let me give you a quick breakdown of something known as the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal axis or the HP ta you see we have the hypothalamus that sends a signal to the pituitary then the pituitary sends something known as luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone down to the testes to produce testosterone so what we found is that this corticotropin-releasing hormone when it shuts off the luteinizing hormone it literally shuts off the signal from the brain to the testes to ever produce testosterone so overtraining is directly telling the brain to no longer produce testosterone it goes right in line with the theory of biology that we shouldn’t be procreating when we’re stressed out but what about the cortisol theory as well well since we have a related increase in cortisol we can actually find that cortisol has a big effect on testosterone too but what they found is that chorus all cuts off testosterone production directly at the testes what that means is that cortisol above all just cuts off the supply like that it just says wait a minute kill it so whereas the corticotropin-releasing hormone goes sort of a wrap-around way and goes to the brain cortisol has a direct phone call to the testes and says no more testosterone kill it so that is really interesting but when we couple the two together when we look at the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal axis and we connect the corticotropin cutting off the luteinizing hormone and the cortisol cutting off the testicular production we have a double whammy of testosterone killing going on right there so that means we’re in a situation where testosterone levels are killed by two different pathways making it that much harder to recover and the only way to truly recover from that is to take some time off so you have to sit back and you have to realize when you’re truly overtraining and it doesn’t take much and I’ve said this in other videos but look at the big picture we have different buckets and they all tap into the same stress response in the same cortisol response whether you’re working out in a controlled environment and controlled stress or you have uncontrolled stress in your life coming from family or work it’s still dipping into that same reservoir of energy you have so you have to look at your life in a balance stop living your life in a box stop thinking that if you miss the gym because you’re super stressed out that you’re a terrible person and factor in overtraining and the cytokine hypothesis and of course the corticotropin hypothesis and the cortisol hypothesis it’s all relative but of course what Trump’s all is a good diet diet is gonna be what allows you to produce the right kind of cortical steroids the right kind of glucocorticoids and the right kind of hormones to live the best possible life now if you want more videos on overtraining I’m happy to dive into the science but as I say in a lot of videos we’re just now scratching the surface there’s a lot to be learned and a lot of research to be done so I’ll see you in the next video

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Overtraining: The Effect on Hormones & Testosterone- Thomas DeLauer

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Overtraining: The Effect on Hormones & Testosterone- Thomas DeLauer… When we work out, we’re causing stress in our bodies. That’s a given, everyone has said that. But what we want to understand is how this stress can lead to overtraining, and how this overtraining can lead to diminished hormone function, and we know how important hormones are. Things like testosterone obviously play a critical factor in how much body fat we accumulate, how much body fat we burn, and overall how much muscle we build. So now there are some direct links with overtraining and testosterone decline. So let’s dive into the science and let’s understand if you’re truly overtraining.

Alright, so first off we have to understand what the symptoms of overtraining are, and the problem is they’re a little bit vague because they hit everyone a little bit different. But in general, we’re talking serious, serious fatigue. Then we’re also talking sleeplessness. When you’re overtraining you are in a situation where your catecholamines like your adrenaline, your other fight or flight hormones are skyrocketing, meaning you don’t sleep very well. But you’re also going to find yourself in a situation where you’re getting sick a lot. You’re not able to recover. And also when you don’t recover, you have declines in performance. So if you’re feeling like you’re at a plateau, there’s a very good chance you’re overtraining. Well, let me rephrase that. No matter who you are, there’s a good chance you’re overtraining, ’cause it doesn’t take much.

But the big factor here is testosterone. What kind of effect does truly overtraining and does stress have on testosterone production? And not only men, but women too. Of course, it’s going to have a bigger impact on men because we’re driven a little bit more by testosterone, but it still applies to both genders. Now when we look at the science, it’s easy to think that it could be the cytokine hypothesis. Now the cytokine hypothesis shows that whenever you train harder, whenever you work out, or whenever you work out for a long period of time without adequate rest or recovery, you end up in a situation where you have vast amounts of interleukins that injure the body, or they’re produced. So we’re talking interleukin one, interleukin three, five, six, 10, 15. These interleukins trigger specific inflammatory responses within the body. We have to remember, with training we want inflammation. Inflammation is what heals us and recovers us. But if it happens too much, it takes energy away from the rest of the body.

References:
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7) RL, N. (n.d.). Effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone on luteinizing hormone, testosterone, and cortisol secretion in intact male rhesus macaques. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from

8) Cortisol-Induced Suppression of Plasma Testosterone in Normal Adult Males | The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism | Oxford Academic. (1976, September 1). Retrieved from

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