OMAD Diet vs. Intermittent Fasting (16/8): Does One Meal a Day Work? Thomas DeLauer

OMAD Diet vs. Intermittent Fasting (16/8): Does One Meal a Day Work? Thomas DeLauer

OMAD Diet vs. Intermittent Fasting (16/8): Does One Meal a Day Work? Thomas DeLauer

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prolonged fasting intermittent fasting force endo fasting and now one meal a day fasting what the heck are we supposed to do well let’s take a look at the various forms of fasting and in this video let’s really breakdown the one meal a day Oh mad diet – intermittent fasting in a 16-8 style so what I want to do in this video is help you understand these two types of fasting and what might work better for you by looking at three very reputable studies hey if you haven’t already make sure you hit that subscribe button that way you can see truly clinical and data-driven videos every Tuesday Friday and Sunday at 7 a.m. Pacific time and if you haven’t already hit that little Bell icon to turn on notifications so you know whenever I go live alright first and foremost what the heck is the Oh mad diet it’s something that’s gaining popularity a lot recently and what it stands for is one meal a day so essentially it is a form of intermittent fasting just in a little bit more of an extreme sense so in essence what you’re doing is you’re fasting for 23 or 23 and a half hours and then you’re consolidating all of your calories into one meal per day it sounds a little bit intense and quite honestly it is now more commonly a lot of us know intermittent fasting as something that’s more of a 16 hour fast eight hour eating window so what I’d like to do is I’d like to compare ohm add to sixteen eight but I’d also like to compare it to the overall traditional three square meals a day morning midday and dinner so the first thing I want to do is I want to dive into this one study that was published in the American Journal of Clinical Investigation it was an eight-week study that took a look at two groups okay one group consumed traditional 3 square meals ok morning midday and evening the other group consumed one meal a day and they wanted to look at overall body composition results and what actually happened after eight weeks of eating like this so what they did do is they had each of these subjects eat the right amount of calories to maintain their body weight so each person ate a different amount but it was all relative to what they weighed and what it would take to keep them weighing roughly the same so what they found at the end of the study is that both groups stayed roughly the same weight however the one meal a day group lost on average four point six pounds where the other group lost 3.1 so we’re still pretty close but the one meal a day group did lose a little bit more body weight now both groups ended up maintaining their lean body mass the same so there wasn’t any loss in muscle but there was a little bit of loss in fat now this is all fine and dandy and we really like the science and we like knowing that one meal a day is gonna allow you to burn a little bit more fat than three square meals but that’s really not that aggressive that’s honestly not enough to convince me to consolidate all of my eating into a 30-minute window so let’s take a look at another study that was published in the Journal of translational medicine and this study took a look at more of a 16-8 fasting window versus typical breakfast lunch and dinner so this study took a look at test subjects that consumed either three square meals a day at 8 a.m. 1 p.m. and 8 p.m. versus those that were following a 16-8 intermittent fasting strategy eating at 1 p.m. 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. and what they found at the end of the study was again that lean body mass stayed about the same but on average the fasting group had a 16% reduction in overall fat mass so we had a major major difference in the intermittent fasting group from the standard eating group when it came down to fat loss now compare this to the one meal a day study that I just talked about basically what I’m saying here is that the 16-8 category ended up allowing the participants to burn much more fat than those that were in the different study doing the one meal a day diet now there’s a lot of different hypotheses here we can take a look at insulin levels we can take a look at glucose levels we can take a look at calories in all of that but wouldn’t all comes down to it we really have to look at the big picture how sustainable is it to truly live a lifestyle where you’re only eating one meal per day that really might not be that fun at least with a 16-8 strategy you’re spacing your meals out where you can still kind of enjoy the same general context of maybe a breakfast lunch and dinner just shrunken down into a smaller window but to really give ourselves a tiebreaker we have to look at another study this study was published in the journal metabolism and it was also an eight-week study with the same structure as the study that I referenced that was published in the American Journal of Clinical Investigation so it was eight weeks and this one wanted to look at the difference between one meal a day and three square meals on the effect of blood glucose well here’s what’s wild the one meal a day group ended up having significantly higher levels of plasma blood glucose in a fasted state in the morning what the heck the fasted group had higher blood glucose well let’s do the math you’re taking someone that is consuming all of their calories at one point of the day that’s going to be a huge massive spike in insulin of course it’s gonna cause a blood glucose to go up and it’s probably gonna stay elevated all the way through the next day whereas when we look at the blood glucose levels in the original study with a 16-8 group their plasma blood glucose levels were nice and low and their insulin levels were nice and low showing that fasting still has powerful fat loss effects but if you enlarge your eating window just a tiny bit you’ve been at least level off the blood glucose so you don’t have a constant flood of insulin and remember insulin is slowing down your fat loss the other thing that we really want to look at here is the fact that both of these instances are not realistic you see my opinion on fasting is that you should be intermittent fasting three maybe four times per week as a catalyst to encourage fat loss in addition to whatever diet you’re doing so for example instead of fasting every single day you fast a few days per week to really shock your system and keep it fresh so if you’re gonna go one meal per day and you’re gonna do that every single day you’re probably going to start having some kind of hormonal Cascades they’re gonna throw things awry in the first place even if you 16-8 fast every single day you might run into the same problem later on down the line so the general hypothesis here is that yes the one meal a day diet is definitely going to get you to burn some fat but is it sustainable and how does it truly compare to the 16 eight where you can truly enjoy a little bit more of a lifestyle so you have to make your own opinion here you have to make your own educated decision on what you want to do but either way when we look at the diets and how they compare side-by-side looking at apples to apples as much as we possibly can even though they’re not really apples to apples we can start to understand that we have so much more at play than just thermodynamics and how many calories we consume on these kinds of diets so as always make sure you’re keeping it locked in here on my channel if you have ideas for future videos or you’d like to see me do more comparisons I’m happy to do them just put down in the comment section below I’ll see you in the next video

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OMAD Diet vs. Intermittent Fasting (16/8): Does One Meal a Day Work? Thomas DeLauer

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OMAD Diet vs. Intermittent Fasting (16/8): Does One Meal a Day Work? Thomas DeLauer… Prolonged fasting, intermittent fasting, crescendo fasting, and now one meal a day fasting. What the heck are we supposed to do? Well, let’s take a look at the various forms of fasting, and in this video, let’s really break down the one meal a day, OMAD diet, to intermittent fasting in a 16:8 style. So what I want to do in this video is help you understand these two types of fasting and what might work better for you by looking at three very reputable studies.

All right, first and foremost, what the heck is the OMAD diet? It’s something that’s gaining popularity a lot recently, and what it stands for is one meal a day. So essentially, it is a form of intermittent fasting, just in a little bit more of an extreme sense. So in essence what you’re doing is you’re fasting for 23 or 23 1/2 hours, and then you’re consolidating all of your calories into one meal per day. It sounds a little bit intense, and quite honestly it is. Now, more commonly a lot of us know intermittent fasting as something that’s more of 16 hour fast, eight hour eating window. So what I’d like to do is I’d like to compare OMAD to 16:8, but I’d also like to compare it to the overall traditional three square meals a day. Morning, midday, and dinner.

So the first thing that I want to do is I want to dive into this one study that was published in the American Journal of Clinical Investigation. It was an eight week study that took a look at two groups, okay? One group consumed traditional three square meals, okay? Morning, midday, and evening. The other group consumed one meal a day. And they wanted to look at overall body composition results and what actually happened after eight weeks of eating like this. So what they did do is they had each of these subjects eat the right amount of calories to maintain their body weight. So each person ate a different amount, but it was all relative to what they weighed and what it would take to keep them weighing roughly the same. So what they found at the end of the study is that both groups stayed roughly the same weight. However, the one meal a day group lost on average 4.6 pounds where the other group lost 3.1. So we’re still pretty close, but the one meal a day group did lose a little bit more body weight.

Now both groups ended up maintaining their lean body mass the same, so there wasn’t any loss in muscle, but there was a little bit of loss in fat. Now this is all fine and dandy, and we really like the science, and we like knowing that one meal a day is going to allow you to burn a little bit more fat than three square meals, but that’s really not that aggressive. That’s honestly not enough to convince me to consolidate all of my eating into a 30 minute window. So let’s take a look at another study that was published in the Journal of Translational Medicine, and this study took a look at more of a 16:8 fasting window versus typical breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

References:
1) A controlled trial of reduced meal frequency without caloric restriction in healthy, normal-weight, middle-aged adults. (n.d.). Retrieved from

2) Impact of Reduced Meal Frequency Without Caloric Restriction on Glucose Regulation in Healthy, Normal Weight Middle-Aged Men and Women. (n.d.). Retrieved from

3) Omad Diet- One Meal A Day Diet. (n.d.). Retrieved from

4) Effects of eight weeks of time-restricted feeding (16/8) on basal metabolism, maximal strength, body composition, inflammation, and cardiovascular risk factors in resistance-trained males. (2016, October 13). Retrieved from

5) Effects of eight weeks of time-restricted feeding (16/8) on basal metabolism, maximal strength, body composition, inflammation, and cardiovascular risk factors in resistance-trained males. (n.d.). Retrieved from

6) 16:8 fasting diet actually works, study finds. (n.d.). Retrieved from

7) Effects of 8-hour time restricted feeding on body weight and metabolic disease risk factors in obese adults: A pilot study – IOS Press. (2018, June 15). Retrieved from

8) Trepanowski JF , et al. (n.d.). Effect of Alternate-Day Fasting on Weight Loss, Weight Maintenance, and Cardioprotection Among Metabolically Healthy Obese Adults: A Randomized Cli… – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from 1

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