Nutrition Basics: Glycemic Index vs Glycemic Load

Nutrition Basics: Glycemic Index vs Glycemic Load

Nutrition Basics: Glycemic Index vs Glycemic Load

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don’t you ever wish that people would just make really simple videos for really simple topics especially related to health well I want to do that with this video but make it short you make it sweet make it straight to the point we’re talking about glycemic index vs. glycemic load and this is probably something you’ve wondered you’ve heard glycemic index before you’ve heard glycemic load but maybe you’re even afraid to ask like what the heck is it and what’s the difference so let’s just make it really simple for you okay it all comes down to how carbohydrates react within our bodies and what they do okay so make sure you hit that red subscribe button and then please hit that little Bell icon so you can turn on notifications so you know whenever I go live then after this video please check out the rive Market down below in the description that’s an online grocery store so I’m able to put like all my keto boxes my fasting boxes all groceries that I would normally get I can consolidate them into like an online grocery box that you guys can therefore go and order so that way you utilize the right market get groceries delivered right to your doorstep so please do check them out after you watch this video super awesome deals there so glycemic index is how quickly a fixed amount of food or carbohydrates get converted into glucose okay so yes if you have one specific amount how quickly does that elevate your blood sugar and get converted into glucose okay so for example glucose is 100 it’s the highest point that you can get to so for example wheat bread is a 75 okay carrots are a 40 broccoli is a 15 and eggs are a zero it’s just that’s just how you measure sort of the carbohydrate glucose density of something but here’s something pretty interesting so the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published a study it was done out of Harvard took a look at 12 men gave them nearly identical meals ok so literally they ate the same meal same calories the same macronutrient same proteins fats and carbs the only difference was the glycemic index was 37 in one group and was 84 in another okay so high glycemic versus low glycemic the participants didn’t even know their food was different okay now what they found is that the high glycemic index caused a big blood sugar spike and then a strong dip below baseline three hours later but when they looked at their brains under fMRI they found that the nucleus accumbens was lit up like a Christmas tree okay the nucleus accumbens is the part that is associated with addiction so we definitely saw that even when food tastes the same higher glycemic index will make you more addicted to it so that’s why you want to avoid high glycemic foods you want to go low GI even if it’s comparable foods otherwise now what’s glycemic load okay see people interchange them and they get them mixed up class emic load is how much a non fixed amount affects your blood glucose okay so again it’s basically our glycemic index multiplied by how much you eat so we use that same example of wheat bread wheat bread is no matter what going to be a 75 whether you eat one piece of wheat bread or hundred pieces of wheat bread it’s still the same glycemic index it still spikes your blood sugar at the same rate of speed but glycemic load ends up factoring in how much of it there is so in this case we read times to still 75 GI but two times the load okay the best way to compare it is like caloric density we say we look at one piece of food compared to another and we say oh well that’s more calorically dense than the other so a simple thing and be like a square of butter might have just as many calories as an entire steak okay but it’s because the butter is more calorically dense than the steak right so it’s all about balancing this glycemic index in this glycemic load so when you look at like Simic a load at that number you want to understand well how much of this food is making how much of an impact in my body so you should always look at glycemic index and glycemic load because this can carry you over for a longer period of time anyhow that’s a basic understanding of it hope that helped cleared some simple science up for you and make sure you’re coming back here every single day because we’ve got new videos at 7:30 a.m. Pacific time every day see you tomorrow

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Nutrition Basics: Glycemic Index vs Glycemic Load

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Glycemic Index vs Glycemic Load: Nutrition Basics – Thomas DeLauer

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So glycemic index is how quickly a fixed amount of food or carbohydrates get converted into glucose. So it’s if you have one specific amount, how quickly does that elevate your blood sugar and get converted into glucose.

So for example, glucose is 100. It’s the highest point that you can get to. So for example, wheat bread is a 75. Carrots are a 40. Broccoli is a 15. And eggs are a zero. That’s just how you measure sort of the carbohydrate glucose density of something.

So The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published a study that was done out of Harvard. Took a look at 12 men, gave them nearly identical meals. So literally they ate the same meal, same calories, the same macronutrients, same proteins, fats and carbs. The only difference was the glycemic index was 37 in one group, and was 84 in another.

So high glycemic versus low glycemic. The participants didn’t even know their food was different. Now what they found is that the high glycemic index caused a big blood sugar spike and then a strong dip below baseline three hours later. But when they looked at their brains under fMRI, they found that the nucleus accumbens was lit up like a Christmas tree.

The nucleus accumbens is the part that is associated with addiction. So we definitely saw that even when food tastes the same, higher glycemic index will make you more addicted to it. So that’s why you want to avoid high glycemic foods. You want to go low GI, even if it’s comparable foods otherwise.

Now what’s glycemic load? See, people interchange them and they get them mixed up. Glycemic load is how much a non-fixed amount affects your blood glucose. So again, it’s basically our glycemic index multiplied by how much you eat.

So we use that same example of wheat bread. Wheat bread is, no matter what, going to be a 75. Whether you eat one piece of wheat bread or a hundred pieces of wheat bread, it’s still the same glycemic index. It still spikes your blood sugar at the same rate of speed. But glycemic load ends up factoring in how much of it there is. So in this case, wheat bread times two, still 75 GI, but two times the load.

The best way to compare it is like caloric density. We look at one piece of food compared to another and we say, oh, well that’s more calorically dense than the other.

So a simple thing it’d be like a square of butter might have just as many calories as an entire steak. But it’s because the butter is more calorically dense than the steak. So it’s all about balancing this glycemic index and this glycemic load.

So when you look at glycemic load at that number, you want to understand, well, how much of this food is making how much of an impact in my body. So you should always look at glycemic index and glycemic load because this can carry you over for a longer period of time.

Nicholas Norwitz – Oxford Ketone PhD Researcher and Harvard Med Student:
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