Intermittent Fasting & Alcohol: How Alcohol Affects Fasting

Intermittent Fasting & Alcohol: How Alcohol Affects Fasting

Intermittent Fasting & Alcohol: How Alcohol Affects Fasting

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how does intermittent fasting affect alcohol metabolism and how does alcohol consumption affect intermittent fasting and your overall results well I’m gonna do a deep dive on this I’m gonna talk about how alcohol is actually metabolized all the different enzymatic functions from soup to nuts a twosie I’m gonna give you a breakdown so you know what’s happening in your body and then I’m gonna circle it back to talk about how it intertwines with fasting and how you can start utilizing some different tactics but also how you can truly understand and appreciate the amount of effort that goes in to simply processing alcohol and how it can affect fasting now if you haven’t already please make sure you hit that subscribe button and if you already subscribed you have to turn on those notifications so you know whenever I post a new video but also whenever I go live and do my q and A’s alright let’s talk about this so first and foremost before I go into anything I do want to say this for those that have a short attention span and just want to get to the gist of it alcohol does break a fast alcohol contains seven calories which means there is a strong metabolic response within the body to process alcohol it will break a fast so when we look at it we actually have to remember that alcohol is almost like the other macronutrient remember the old campaigns for pork the other white meat well I would almost argue that alcohol is the other macronutrient protein has four calories per gram fats have nine calories per gram carbs have four calories per gram and woohoo here comes good old alcohol with seven calories per gram there’s a lot of enzymatic functions it’s still metabolized it does break a fast I don’t know who would want to really break it fast with alcohol in the first place so let’s get down to the science let’s talk about how this actually works alright so as soon as you consume alcohol it begins being broken down in your body through something known as alcohol dehydrogenase now alcohol dehydrogenase is a simple thing just like the name implies it takes away hydrogen atoms so it ends up breaking down by breaking apart the hydrogen’s so it does this pretty simply it does it as soon as it hits the mouth and it does this as soon as the alcohol it’s the stomach and then from there the alcohol which is now partially broken down travels through very very small capillaries throughout the entirety of your liver I’m talking every nook and cranny remember the liver is made up of lots of small micro capillaries that it can filter things so when it comes down to it we are getting alcohol into every portion of our liver so that our liver can then our liver uses two enzymes to break the alcohol down even further it uses again our friend alcohol dehydrogenase to begin breaking the alcohol down into something known as acetaldehyde here’s the thing acetaldehyde is about 30 times more toxic than alcohol so you might be wondering why does the body take something that’s already toxic and make it even more HEPA toxic well the answer is simple it’s a smaller molecule it’s a less complex breakdown so even though it’s more toxic it’s easier for the liver to handle the point is you don’t want this acetaldehyde in your system for very long you want your liver to be able to handle it at a moment’s notice and be able to take it out of your system before it does some serious damage so that’s where the second enzyme comes in something known as aldehyde dehydrogenase this aldehyde dehydrogenase is job is to break down the acetaldehyde so it just tastes Lee does what the alcohol dehydrogenase did just one step further further breaks down even more hydrogen atoms so that this acetaldehyde this very toxic substance can be broken down very efficiently and it’s broken down into something that’s rather harmless called acetate and then this acetate is broken down into good old fashioned water and co2 so yeah it’s pretty complex it’s amazing the body can take alcohol something so toxic and through a series of enzymatic functions in the liver actually turn it in to water and carbon dioxide pretty amazing but then it goes one step further okay well you know how it’s actually processing the liver but it actually does some other things you see there’s one very specific enzyme this enzyme is called cytochrome p450 and I know it sounds like something out of Star Wars but it’s not cytochrome p450 is a specific enzyme that breaks down alcohol in an entirely different way in cytochrome p450 is only really active in those that drink regularly so if you’re someone that drinks every night or maybe you’re just on a binge at one specific point in time you’re going to have elevated amounts of cytochrome p450 here’s the scary thing though cytochrome p450 changes how our body looks at alcohol altogether rather than just this metabolism being isolated into the liver cytochrome p450 starts making alcohol metabolized in a different substrate of the cell which means it actually becomes somewhat more of our DNA meaning our cells are a dating to breaking down alcohol because we’re consuming so much of it which is kind of scary and what we have to be cognizant of okay so that’s cytochrome but there’s another enzyme to one known as catalase catalase is the one that’s under a lot of scrutiny by researchers right now what catalase does is it takes this alcohol and breaks it down also into acetaldehyde but it combines it with other enzymes so that it can get into the brain so catalase is sort of this carrier of acetaldehyde into the brain which could contribute to the impairment could contribute to why you get some of the psychological effects of alcohol but even more importantly it allows this acetaldehyde this very toxic compound to combine with neurotransmitters in your brain to ultimately create something known as tetra hydro s O’Quinn aleene’s also known as tea IQs these tea IQs are interesting components that are created in the brain that may contribute to addiction so when we create tea IQs we actually allow our brain to become more addicted to alcohol simply because they’re combining with neurotransmitters and they’re becoming part of our standard electrical functions within the brain okay I don’t want to spend a whole lot of time on that cuz it’s a whole separate story but let’s talk about glutathione really fast – okay this is something I’m gonna touch on briefly glutathione is our body’s natural antioxidant right so whenever we consume alcohol our liver processes all this these enzymes break it down and then we have something called glutathione which comes in and neutralizes some of the poison okay then glutathione comes in it’s already in our body it neutralizes the poison and it does this by donating an electron so basically if you have a pool of glutathione they all have spare electrons they donate an electron that ultimately neutralizes the electrical charge of a poison eventually those glutathione stores run out now when your glutathione stores right now that’s when you feel groggy that’s the hangover effect okay so that’s something we have to pay attention to now we start the link to fasting first and foremost fasting restore your glutathione levels so fasting can actually allow you to recover from alcohol significantly better so those old days of after a night of drinking where you have to eat some big greasy breakfast no it’s quite the opposite you actually want to be fasting so that your glutathione stores can be elevated your body can detox but let’s talk about this really quick when you are fasting your body is not consuming any food you’re not having any kind of nutrients coming in you’re actually having to rely on your body’s own stores this means that something called the pyloric valve which is a valve between your stomach and your small intestine is wide open this pyloric valve is what allows food into the small intestine when you’re ready to consume food when you’re ready to actually absorb nutrients when you are full the pyloric valve closes when that valve closes food is not getting into the small intestine well what does this have to do with fasting and alcohol well our stomach has a few feet of surface area a few feet of surface area to actually absorb nutrients our small intestines because of the structure in the villi actually have thousands of square feet of surface area even though it’s only so many feet long because of the structure it has a lot of surface area surface area means that you can absorb alcohol very fast so your pyloric valve is open when you’re fasting so it means alcohol that you’re consuming is gonna go right into your small intestine and get your blood alcohol level very high very fast some of you might be saying well this is a good thing makes me a cheap date not really I mean yes but the thing is it’s gonna get so much alcohol in your body so fast that those enzymes I talked about the alcohol dehydrogenase the aldehyde dehydrogenase the cytochrome p450 and of course the catalase aren’t going to be able to keep up so what does that mean that means that your liver now has to prioritize the metabolism and alcohol above all else because it ran out of enzymes the liver is now preoccupied with handling this other macronutrient known as alcohol which means the other food that you consume has to take a backseat it doesn’t get processed the fatty acids don’t get broken down the triglycerides don’t get broken down as efficiently because your body is on high alert to manage the acetaldehyde to manage the alcohol so all those awesome effects all those awesome effects of spiking the insulin and getting the right carbohydrates in getting the right protein in at the end of a fast you go out the window I’m not saying that you have to live a totally spare life and never drink alcohol in fact I’m going to give you some feedback here but you do want to make sure that you’re probably watching your alcohol consumption on your fasting days even if it is after breaking a fast simply because you are already in a situation where your body’s going to assimilate the alcohol much much easier now of course we also have to talk briefly about how alcohol negatively affects the central nervous system alcohol slows down catecholamine responses it slows down cortisol it slows down adrenaline that’s why your reflexes are so poor when you’re impaired now if you’ve seen my other videos talking about how fasting actually literally burns fat a lot of it is through noradrenaline in a journal in catecholamines that are created by the adrenals that are ultimately part of our central nervous system so a lot of the fat-burning and positive effect of fasting in the first place comes from central nervous system stimulation and a really well-oiled machine when it comes down to your CNS so you’re really negating the effects of it by consuming alcohol even if it’s after breaking a fast last but not least if you are going to consume alcohol you do want to do it after having a small amount of carbohydrates okay a small amount because well that’s gonna do is it’s gonna start to close the pyloric valve but it’s also gonna put some glycogen into the liver this glycogen effect in the liver is going to allow the liver to combine glycogen along with this acetaldehyde for a softer absorption and actually buffers the liver a little bit but don’t get me wrong you don’t want to be consuming a ton of carbohydrates I’m talking like 20 or 30 grams okay and the big question that people are probably wondering is what alcohol should you consider drinking okay I don’t want to go on another tangent here but I’m gonna break it down briefly alcohol is not a clean process to be made okay a lot of times there are a lot of preservatives a lot of congenial a lot of other things that are added into it and the distillation process isn’t always as clean as we’d like it to be so whenever possible triple distilled or quadruple distilled alcohols whenever possible gin vodka things like that make it much much easier a much healthier okay also make sure you’re not drinking wines that have a bunch of sulfites or anything like that those are additional metabolites those are things that require a secondary process by the liver which means in the liver again has to process the acetaldehyde first then the sulfides then the preservatives and then all these other things your body is not going to feel good and it’s not going to thank you so keep it clean whenever possible and keep it on a non fasting day I know that was a big in-depth breakdown but I hope it helped clear some things up and as always keep it locked in here in my channel I’ll see you in the next video

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Intermittent Fasting & Alcohol: How Alcohol Affects Fasting – Thomas DeLauer

How does intermittent fasting effect alcohol metabolism, and how does alcohol consumption effect intermittent fasting and your overall results? Well, I’m going to do a deep dive on this; I’m going to talk about how alcohol is actually metabolized, all the different enzymatic functions from soup to nuts, A to Z. I’m going to give you a breakdown so you know what’s happening in your body, and then I’m going to circle it back to talk about how it intertwines with fasting and how you can start utilizing some different tactics, but also how you can truly understand and appreciate the amount of effort that goes into simply processing alcohol, and how it can effect fasting.

Now if you haven’t already, please make sure you hit that “subscribe” button, and if you’re already subscribed, you have to turn on those notifications so you know whenever I post a new video, but also whenever I go live and do my Q&As.

All right, let’s talk about this. First and foremost, before I go into anything, I do want to say this for those that have a short attention span and just want to get to the gist of it: alcohol does break a fast. Alcohol contains seven calories, which means there is a strong metabolic response within the body to process alcohol. It will break a fast. When we look at it, we actually have to remember that alcohol is almost like the other macro-nutrient. Remember the old campaigns for pork, “the other white meat?” Well I would almost argue that alcohol is the other macro-nutrient. Protein has four calories per gram, fats have nine calories per gram, carbs have four calories per gram, and woohoo, here comes good old alcohol with seven calories per gram. There’s a lot of enzymatic functions; it still metabolizes, it does break a fast, but I don’t know who would want to really break a fast with alcohol in the first place.

Let’s get down to the science: let’s talk about how this actually works. All right, so as soon as you consume alcohol, it begins being broken down in your body through something known as “alcohol dehydrogenase.” Now alcohol dehydrogenase is a simple thing. Just like the name implies, it takes away hydrogen atoms. It ends up breaking down by breaking apart the hydrogen. It does this pretty simply; it does it as soon as it hits the mouth, and it does it as soon as the alcohol hits the stomach. Then from there, the alcohol, which is now partially broken down, travels through very, very small capillaries throughout the entirety of your liver. I’m talking every nook and cranny. Remember, the liver is made up of lots of small micro-capillaries that it can filter things. When it comes down to it, we are getting alcohol into every portion of our liver so that our liver can handle it. Then our liver uses two enzymes to break the alcohol down even further. It uses, again, our friend alcohol dehydrogenase to begin breaking the alcohol down into something known as “acetaldehyde.”

Here’s the thing: acetaldehyde is about 30 times more toxic than alcohol. You might be wondering, “Why does the body take something that’s already toxic and make it even more hepatoxic?” Well, the answer is simple: it’s a smaller molecule. It’s a less complex breakdown, so even though it’s more toxic, it’s easier for the liver to handle. Point is, you don’t want this acetaldehyde in your system for very long. You want your liver to be able to handle it at a moment’s notice and be able to take it out of your system before it does some serious damage. That’s where the second enzyme comes in, something known as “aldehyde dehydrogenase.” This aldehyde dehydrogenase’s job is to break down the acetaldehyde. It just basically does what the alcohol dehydrogenase did, just one step further. It further breaks down even more hydrogen atoms so that this acetaldehyde, this very toxic substance, can be broken down very efficiently. It’s broken down into something that’s rather harmless called “acetate,” and then this acetate is broken down into good old fashioned water and CO2.

Yeah, it’s pretty complex. It’s amazing that the body can take alcohol, something so toxic, and through a series of enzymatic functions in the liver, actually turn it into water and carbon dioxide. Pretty amazing, but then it goes one step further. We know how it’s actually processed in the liver, but it actually does some other things. You see, there’s one very specific enzyme. This enzyme is called “cytochrome P450.” I know it sounds like something out of Star Wars, but it’s not. Cytochrome P450 is a specific enzyme that breaks down alcohol in an entirely different way, and cytochrome P450 is only really active in those that drink regularly.

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