HIIT Training Tip | 4 Ways to Use Battle Ropes to Maximize your HIIT Workouts- Thomas DeLauer

HIIT Training Tip | 4 Ways to Use Battle Ropes to Maximize your HIIT Workouts- Thomas DeLauer

HIIT Training Tip | 4 Ways to Use Battle Ropes to Maximize your HIIT Workouts- Thomas DeLauer

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these little guys battle ropes will absolutely change the way that you do high-intensity interval training no matter what level you are at whether you’re just a beginner that’s just getting started doing hit or you’re someone that’s experienced with their imply Oh metrics and hit training functional training you name it if you do those right you’re going to get a better metabolic result we’re gonna dive into four different ways that you can use battle ropes but before we get into the specifics and the technical aspect of this I want to give you an explanation as to why incorporating your upper body as much as possible in your hit workouts is going to be the key to getting better results it’s not getting the full body involved there is scientific evidence that using the upper body specifically with high intensity interval training he’s going to get you better results you are tuned into the Internet’s leading performance nutrition and fat loss channel new videos coming out every single Tuesday Friday and Sunday in the world of keto fasting and specific high-intensity interval training tips so make sure that you’re keeping it locked in here make sure you turn on that little bell button so you can turn on notifications whenever I go live and make sure you check out highly calm down in the description so you see the latest and greatest premium performance apparel that I’m always wearing in my videos alright so let’s go ahead and break down why working the upper body with high-intensity interval training is so imperative you see it’s actually pretty common knowledge amongst the scientific community that when you work the upper body you have a harder or greater work component that just means that the body has to work harder in order to incorporate so if you are working equally hard on your lower body as you are on your upper body you’re gonna get a higher heart rate and a higher blood pressure out of working your upper body in fact the Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy actually published a study that found that literally by training the upper body you got a higher heart rate and higher blood pressure and it had to do with the peripheral resistance on the actual artery itself you see what happens is with larger muscles down in the lower body like the legs we have muscles that can assist in the contraction of that arterial wall so basically the muscles in the legs are big enough to help push the blood along that’s believe it or not a pretty big reason to why we can actually run for longer distances versus do like a bicycle ergometer or arm or domitor right so what’s happening is in your upper body you have less muscle mass than the legs so you don’t have the muscle mass to squeeze the blood back a little bit you’re relying purely on the arterial wall you’re relying on the muscle contraction of arterial wall itself so you end up getting your heart to work a lot harder and the whole idea with hit to be completely honest is to get the heart rate really high and then drop it as fast as you can so the cool thing is you get your heart rate elevated by using the upper body it’s actually going to come down faster too because the transit time is a little bit less it can action come back to the heart and refill that left ventricle a little bit faster so your stroke volume stays nice and strong the heart can work as hard as it needs to now the reasons that makes training your upper body significantly better is the fact that you have less of a mean transit time now what that means it’s not necessarily just about the time that the blood travels to your extremities it’s about the red blood cells spin in a particular area so for example the red blood cells are delivering oxygen they’re flowing through my arms and they’re having to diffuse into capillaries and smaller blood vessels that means the red blood cells are not spending as much time there so they don’t have as much time to oxygenate tissue and therefore go through the ATP coupling ATP synthesis phase so you’re in a pretty unique situation where you actually have to pump more blood to get the same desired result out of moving the arm than you would the leg so that’s why battle ropes and things like that are a great great thing to add into your hit routine nationally because the capillaries are so small what happens is the blood has to be forced into these rapidly diffusing capillaries if you’re pumping blood down into your legs you have your femoral artery you have these arteries that are big mega super highways running down your legs so it can force the blood down and minute diffuses into capillaries but in your upper body you have lots of small capillaries and they start diffusing into them very fast so I pump blood from the heart it’s going into my shoulders and it’s rapidly diffusing into the tissue in my upper body in my upper arm into multiple thousands and thousands of capillaries so the blood has to be forced into these little teeny capillaries therefore the part is working harder so let’s go ahead and let’s get into these movements so here are four ways that you can use battle ropes because quite frankly battle ropes are commonly done wrong okay people don’t always do battle rope movements right and they actually leave themselves up to getting hurt so the first one that I want to show you is a traditional battle rope movement okay it’s gonna be traditional actually like using both arms and using the battle rope the way that you should so if you look at how I’m doing this here I’m sitting all my weight on my heels okay I’m not hopping okay if you look at me hoppin you can see how my upper back and my lower back are getting incorporated this is a specific kind of movement don’t get me wrong but if you’re just starting out with battle ropes I don’t recommend that you do that and one of the ways that you can get around this is by using a little bit of a lighter battle rope in this case I’m using a heavier battle rope so it’s a lot easier for me to accidentally kind of get into that hop but you do want to get yourself in that athletic stance so we call it just the athletic position where you have a slight bend in the knees and you’re sitting kind of in a partial squat and this way you can actually incorporate your rear delts your anterior delts your medial delts and of course the arms and triceps and that mid back you’re gonna use a lot of rhomboids and a lot of trapezius so you just want to make sure that you’re keeping cognizant of that and you don’t want to bring your arms up higher than about your forehead okay unless simple movement it’s one that’s gonna get you a lot of rapid blood flow and get that heart rate elevated super super quick the next one that I want to show you is going to be single arm and this is gonna be more of a snake movement okay so this is another one that you commonly see done but you also commonly see it done wrong you see people will often times when they do the single arm movements they get so much rotation and they bring their arms up so high that they get a lot of torque and twist to their hips and back this can be good if you’re trying to build a body that’s like gonna withstand a tackle or like if you’re playing football or rugby or anything like that this is perfect for that because you’re gonna actually build that transverse abdominus in that core strength but if we’re trying to just get maximal heart rate we want to keep the movements slow and controlled so you want to sit back into the athletic position and then you want to start slow and then you want to rapidly speed up until you get in a rhythm so you’re doing really short little motions you’re only coming between like oh maybe a 12 and 16 inch area in front of your body with the ropes this is allowing you to get the heart rate where we want it without constantly having a break so what I mean by that is if you get your arms up too high you’re actually taking a little bit of a break on the muscle which therefore you may not feel it the heart isn’t able to pump nearly as much blood because it doesn’t have to so we’re not getting that same effect okay the next one that I want to show you is a unique one this one is where it is okay to come up over your head and this is one that’s overlooked you don’t see people doing them a lot if you have a heavier rope this one’s great okay these are going to be slams and we’re going to do is you’re going to treat your battle rope workout like med ball slams but because sort of the reverberation the actual like overall long tail effect that you get from a battle rope and actually having to like really bring it up and get that wave to go all the way to the bar or wherever it’s anchored you’re getting a different effect than you would with a med ball slam with a medicine ball slam you slam the med ball and it’s done like right like as soon as the ball is on the ground like or leaves your arms the tension is off with battle ropes when you do a slam the tension still remains because you have a long tail of that overall rope so going the Slams with the battle ropes are a great way to incorporate the full body and this is where it’s actually okay to get a little bit more of a leap and hop up a little bit but you’re not trying to go fast I want you to control these like do reps of ten sets of ten excuse me and go ahead and just slam and then re coorporate slam reincorporate the ropes again and go ahead and just you’re gonna restart the movement you’re just doing what you can to keep it nice and controlled this is more of a power move than anything else okay and the next one that I want to show you is taking that same thing but making it a little bit more of a functional move off to the side so we’re doing that same slam but coming off to one side okay so you’re going off to the left make up off to the right come back up to the left then off to the right again we’re coming up overhead and this is a little bit more of an advanced variation so you do have to be careful with us a little bit you don’t want to tweak your back you want to make sure you’re keeping it under control so if you add these into a mix add these into a hit circuit some of the best ways to do it are gonna be upper body lower body upper body lower body so I don’t recommend going straight from battle rope movement into battle rope movement your heart rates gonna get so high that it’s not going to be that good of a workout the goal is get the heart rate high and then move into another larger muscle group so that you can actually get the overall muscular activity of skeletal muscle like actual recruitment but your heart rate is high without having to make it high through another means so what I mean by that is it takes a lot to get your heart rate super high doing plyo box jumps what if I told you you could do some battle ropes feature your heart rate where you want it and then be able to do half as many plyo jumps and get the same result so it ends up working out great heart rate gets higher you still get the plyo effect and then you can just go through a circuit I’ll share more of this movie like these kinds of it one more about hip training and know how to do it properly then make sure you’re keeping it locked in here and more importantly comment down below and let me know if you want to see these types of videos I don’t always do workout content I’m mainly nutrition so if you guys want to see the effects of it just got that alright guys see you in the next video

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HIIT Training Tip | 4 Ways to Use Battle Ropes to Maximize your HIIT Workouts- Thomas DeLauer

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HIIT Training Tip | 4 Ways to Use Battle Ropes to Maximize your HIIT Workouts- Thomas DeLauer…
These little guys, battle ropes, will absolutely change the way that you do high-intensity interval training, no matter what level you are at, whether you’re just a beginner that’s just getting started doing HIIT or you’re someone that’s experienced with doing plyometrics and HIIT training, functional training, you name it. If you do those right, you’re going to get a better metabolic result, and we’re going to dive into four different ways that you can use battle ropes.

But before we get into the specifics and the technical aspect of this, I want to give you an explanation as to why incorporating your upper body as much as possible in your HITT workouts is going to be the key to getting better results. It’s about getting the full body involved. There is scientific evidence that using the upper body, specifically, with high-intensity interval training is going to get you better results.

So let’s go ahead and break down why working the upper body with high-intensity interval training is so imperative. You see, it’s actually pretty common knowledge amongst the scientific community that when you work the upper body, you have a harder or greater work component. That just means that the body has to work harder in order to incorporate. So if you are working equally hard on your lower body as you are on your upper body, you’re going to get a higher heart rate and a higher blood pressure out of working your upper body.

What happens is with larger muscles down in the lower body like the legs, we have muscles that can assist in the contraction of that arterial wall. So basically, the muscles in the legs are big enough to help push the blood along.

So what’s happening is in your upper body, you have less muscle mass than the legs, so you don’t have the muscle mass to squeeze the blood back a little bit. You’re relying purely on the arterial wall. You’re relying on the muscle contraction of the arterial wall itself. So you end up getting your heart to work a lot harder.

So you’re in a pretty unique situation where you actually have to pump more blood to get the same desired result out of moving the arm than you would the leg. So that’s why battle ropes and things like that are a great, great thing to add into your HIIT routine.

So let’s go ahead and let’s get into these movements. So here are four ways that you can use battle ropes. Because quite frankly, battle ropes are commonly done wrong. People don’t always do battle rope movements right, and they actually lead themselves up to getting hurt. So the first one that I want to show you is a traditional battle rope movement. It’s going to be traditional, actually like using both arms and using the battle rope the way that you should.

If you’re just starting out with battle ropes, I don’t recommend that you do that, and one of the ways that you can get around this is by using a little bit of a lighter battle rope. In this case, I’m using a heavier battle rope, so it’s a lot easier for me to accidentally get into that hop.

You would actually incorporate your rear delts, your anterior delts, your medial delts, and of course, the arms and triceps and that mid back. You’re going to use a lot of rhomboids and a lot of trapezius. So you just want to make sure that you’re keeping cognizant of that, and you don’t want to bring your arms up higher than about your forehead. And a less simple movement, and it’s one that’s going to get you a lot of rapid blood flow and get that heart rate elevated super quick.

If we’re trying to just get maximal heart rate, we want to keep the movement slow and controlled. So you want to sit back into the athletic position and then you want to start slow, and then you want to rapidly speed up until you get in a rhythm. So you’re doing really short little motions. You’re only coming between maybe a 12- and 16-inch area in front of your body with the ropes. This is allowing you to get the heart rate where we want it without constantly having a break.

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