Does a Sauna Benefit You or Improve Fat Loss?

Does a Sauna Benefit You or Improve Fat Loss?

Does a Sauna Benefit You or Improve Fat Loss?

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I’m about to totally wow you with the science of how sitting in a sauna for just a short amount of time after a workout or in general can totally shift the way that your body metabolizes energy and shift the way that your body built muscle and burns fat hey if you haven’t already make sure that you hit that subscribe button new videos every Tuesday Friday and Sunday at 7 a.m. Pacific time and all kinds of other videos in between and also make sure you hit that little Bell icon to turn on notifications and always I’m wearing highly so make sure you check out highlight comm for all the apparel that you can so when we’re looking at how a sauna affects the body we’re looking at something known as hyper thermic conditioning the hyperthermic conditioning is just like the name implies we’re conditioning ourselves to be a little bit more exposed to a higher temperature so if hyperthermic conditioning were acclimating our bodies to heat independent of aerobic activity so normally if you go out for a run or you do some kind of aerobic exercise your core body temperature is going to go up simply because you’re moving well with hyperthermic conditioning we’re trying to elicit the same response but without the actual activity we’re just trying to get the core body temperature up and still trying to get the same benefits and now the science is showing the benefits are there so basically what we’re doing is we’re trying to build a generalized tolerance to physiological stress by adapting to heat so just like anything we have an adaptation process that occurs and when we expose ourselves to a lot of heat we do have this adaptation that occurs at a cellular level and different metabolic levels now the biggest one that we probably know i’ve already is the increase of blood flow and plasma volume this one kind of goes without saying okay when you have more heat your blood vessels dilate you get more blood flow yeah that’s all fine and dandy but there’s a lot of really cool stuff coming out in the way of what are called heat shock proteins now the studies that i’m in a reference in this video and believe me there’s quite a few of them are going to really be centered around heat shock proteins and what these heat shock proteins do for not only your recovery but your overall metabolism so a heat shock protein is a highly conserved protein that sits inside of a cell every single organism has them and every single cell has heat shock proteins so they’re proteins that sit in sort of a reserved mode waiting to get acted upon by high stress for instance high heat that’s why they’re called heat shock proteins so what our cells are exposed to heat shock these proteins are released and they protect what are called the folding and unfolding of these different proteins inside of a cell instead of a cell when you build a cell you have proteins that fold on top of each other now sometimes they unfold sometimes they full so these heat shock proteins stabilize them they hold them in place so that they have a little bit more time to recover when exposed to extreme conditions like high heat so this is great we know that these exists we know that they protect the cells but what does it have to do with how our bodies work and how our bodies feel perform and even ultimately get conditioned well to take a look at this want to look at a study that was published in the Journal of athletic training this study took a look at 25 healthy adult subjects and it wanted to investigate what would happen to their cardiovascular system their hormonal system and ultimately their cell structure in general and heat shock proteins if they sat in a sauna for an extended period of time or if they did not so what they did is they had them sit in a sauna that was 73 degrees Celsius some periods of time in other days they had them sit in an area that was 26 degrees Celsius so a stark stark difference between the two one obviously being more like a sauna and one being more like just a standard regular environment so they have them do this for 30 minutes on separate days and then they went ahead and they measure their blood work after each situation and what they found was pretty darn intriguing of course they found in the core body temperature increased after sitting in a sauna it increased by 0.8 degrees Celsius which is a pretty dramatic increase and if you’ve seen my other videos you know that increasing the body temperature increases fatty acid mobilization and lipolysis so that right then and there obviously boots and some fat loss that’s great but they also found there’s an increase in their heart rate by roughly 22 to 23 beats per minute now if you’ve seen my other videos again you know that increasing that heart rate also leads to fat loss it’s pretty straightforward then they found that there is a decrease in blood pressure which may have had to do with the increase in stroke volume the heart not having to work as hard meaning the blood was able to flow quite a bit easier but then we get into the interesting stuff a 58 percent increase in norepinephrine okay if you’ve seen my other videos again you know that nor epinephrine or adrenaline epinephrine all those things play a big role in fatty acid utilization and mobile so if we have higher levels of adrenaline like that then we are ultimately burning more fat and have all kinds of different recovery mechanisms kicking into place so long as we’re not doing it for too much time but then what’s important here is they found that the heat shock proteins that existed in the cells increased by 53.9% so we know now that he shock proteins do elevate when we’re just exposed to high heat when we’re sitting in a sauna but what does this have to do with muscle mass where am i connecting the dots well when we look at how this process works it makes a lot of sense the heat shock proteins stabilize the folds inside the cell which means that the cell is able to recover a little bit easier it’s in a situation where it can be acclimated and it can actually allow recovery to occur so by stabilizing those folds we’re putting the cell in a great place to be able to harness the nutrients that you consume and grow but believe it or not the heat shock proteins also attract amino acids to the site of a damaged area so for example if you go and you work out you’re gonna cause micro trauma inside your cells this micro trauma is what you need to have recovered to ultimately build muscle well that trauma is a damage to site so when you have high levels of heat shock proteins from sitting in a sauna it means the amino acids are going to gravitate to that damaged area and stimulate recovery amino acids are the building blocks of proteins so therefore we start building the muscle again but additionally what ends up happening is these heat shock proteins stabilize the folds and allow the folds to stack on top of each other correctly remember inside of a cell we have folds of proteins that unfold and fold together and that those folds are inaccurate the cell doesn’t build right and eventually apoptosis will occur where the cell just naturally dies so in the presence of heat shock proteins the cell is stabilized so the proteins can actually build themselves properly they can fold properly and the cell becomes high quality therefore you’re getting more muscle mass by utilizing a sauna right after a workout but there’s a little bit more to this maybe you’ve heard of something known as a rhabdo okay it’s rhabdo for short but it stands for rhabdo Milos’s rather Milos’s is basically a condition where you work out so hard or you have so much muscle trauma and the muscle cell actually dies and leaks its contents into the bloodstream when it leaks its contents into the bloodstream it goes into the kidneys and creates a very toxic environment that’s why people that suffer from RAB the Milos’s end up sitting in the hospital for a number of days and then are immobilized for a while they’re not even allowed to work out now these heat shock proteins are not only shown to protect the kidneys from these heat shock proteins that get dumped into the blood but they’ve also been shown to prevent muscle atrophy associated with the immobilization so when you’re looking at someone who is suffering from an injury and they have to stop and they have to not work out for a while if they just sit in a sauna they can stop the muscle atrophy now you may not be able to stop it entirely but you can at least slow it so when you’re in a situation where you have an injury and you’re afraid you’re gonna lose muscle mass you’re afraid you’re gonna get fat well literally sitting in a sauna can stimulate the right kind of things to keep you frozen in time I guess I should say melted in time so that you don’t end up suffering from the issues you’re worried about okay but what about physical performance well this is where it gets really interesting because physical performance obviously leads to muscle mass if we can have more physical performance then we can destroy our muscles a little bit more which means we can elicit more of a recovery response we can have bigger muscles we can be leaner we can be more athletic we can have it all now the first thing that comes to mind obviously again is the stroke volume increase okay we know that acclimating to heat increases stroke volume we know that you’re gonna get more blood to a specific area but let’s take a look at the science and how it really works when it comes down to specific performance indicators so this study was published in the Journal of applied physiology and it took a look at test subjects before and after eight days of heat acclamation so what they did is they had these test subjects do six hours of submaximal activity in the heat followed by 45 seconds of high-intensity activity in the heat after these eight days of acclamation but they measured them before and after so what they found was that after they were heat acclimated they had some pretty dramatic changes to how their body responded to the actual workout after acclamation the athletes ended up utilizing forty to fifty percent less muscle glycogen than they did before what the heck is going on so basically what that means is they were tapping into forty to fifty percent less energy now it has to with muscle perfusion what that means is that since they were acclimated to the heat blood was able to move through the muscle and get to the organs significantly 40 to 50 percent more significantly more efficiently so what that means is that you are able to workout in a much more efficient way utilize less of your stored energy and be able to ultimately perform better imagine if you could work out for 40 or 50 percent longer or harder simply by getting use to being in the heat that’s what this study proved that is a dramatic dramatic difference but it doesn’t stop there there was another study that took a look at the red blood cell count of endurance athletes now this is where it gets crazy because red blood cells deliver oxygen so if we have more red blood cells we have more oxygen which obviously means that we can work out harder work out easier in some ways but what this study found is that test subjects has just did 30 minutes of sauna two times per week ended up being able to run for 32 percent longer than when they didn’t use the sauna a 32 percent increase in their overall endurance capacity 32 percent longer of a run that is a huge huge difference and we’re talking about endurance athletes to begin with so these were people that were already accustomed to being able to run to their maximal ability and the max capacity and they were able to push it almost 1/3 further now that ended up being 7.8 percent increase in their red blood cell count 7.8 percent increase in the amount of oxygen being delivered to your organs to your cells to your muscle to your brain that is powerful and that’s just with two times per week of sitting in a sauna for 30 minutes so if anything comes out of this video it’s to not be shy of the sauna I know it can be tough when you’re in a gym and there’s a lot of people around and you don’t necessarily want to go in the sauna maybe you just buy one for your own garage whatever you want to do there’s some infrared saunas out there that are pretty affordable but the fact is 20 or 30 minutes two times per week can elicit a 30% improvement in your endurance activity and can truly truly start to shape-shift the way that your body metabolizes things it’s all about adaptation here the stronger we get the better we get and what doesn’t kill us makes us stronger to an extent so as always make sure you’re keeping it locked in here on my channel ideas for future videos you know where to put them I’ll see you soon

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Does a Sauna Benefit You or Improve Fat Loss? – Thomas DeLauer

I’m about to totally wow you with the science of how sitting in a sauna for just a short amount of time after a workout or in general can totally shift the way that your body metabolizes energy and shift the way that your body built muscle and burns fat.

When we’re looking at how a sauna affects the body, we’re looking at something known as hyperthermic conditioning. Hyperthermic conditioning is just like the name implies. We’re conditioning ourselves to be a little bit more exposed to a higher temperature. With hyperthermic conditioning, we’re acclimating our bodies to heat independent of aerobic activity. Normally if you go out for a run or you do some kind of aerobic exercise, your core body temperature is going to go up, simply because you’re moving. With hyperthermic conditioning, we’re trying to elicit the same response, but without the actual activity. We’re just trying to get the core body temperature up and still trying to get the same benefits, and now, the science is showing the benefits are there.

Basically what we’re doing is we’re trying to build a generalized tolerance to physiological stress by adapting to heat. Just like anything, we have an adaptation process that occurs, and when we expose ourselves to a lot of heat, we do have this adaptation that occurs at a cellular level and different metabolic levels.

Now the biggest one that we probably know of already is the increase in blood flow and plasma volume. This one kinda goes without saying. When you have more heat, your blood vessels dilate, you get more blood flow, yeah, that’s all fine and dandy, but there’s a lot of really cool stuff coming out in the way of what are called heat shock proteins. Now the studies that I’m gonna reference in this video, and believe me, there’s quite a few of them, are going to really be centered around heat shock proteins and what these heat shock proteins do for not only your recovery, but your overall metabolism.

A heat shock protein is a highly conserved protein that sits inside of a cell. Every single organism has them and every single cell has heat shock proteins. They’re proteins that sit in a reserve mode, waiting to get acted upon by high stress, for instance, high heat. That’s why they’re called heat shock proteins. When our cells are exposed to heat shock, these proteins are released, and they protect what are called the folding and unfolding of these different proteins inside of a cell. Inside of a cell, when you build a cell, you have proteins that fold on top of each other. Now sometimes they unfold, sometimes they fold, so these heat shock proteins stabilize them. They hold them in place so that they have a little bit more time to recover when exposed to extreme conditions like high heat.

References

1) Li Z and Srivastava P. (n.d.). Heat-shock proteins. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from
2) Heat shock proteins – an overview | ScienceDirect Topics. (n.d.). Retrieved from
3) Heat Stress and Cardiovascular, Hormonal, and Heat Shock Proteins in Humans. (2012, March). Retrieved from
4) Selsby JT , et al. (n.d.). Intermittent hyperthermia enhances skeletal muscle regrowth and attenuates oxidative damage following reloading. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from
5) Wei Q , et al. (n.d.). Heme oxygenase-1 induction contributes to renoprotection by G-CSF during rhabdomyolysis-associated acute kidney injury. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from
6) Costa RJ , et al. (n.d.). Heat acclimation responses of an ultra-endurance running group preparing for hot desert-based competition. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from
7) Scoon GS , et al. (n.d.). Effect of post-exercise sauna bathing on the endurance performance of competitive male runners. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from
8) Kukkonen-Harjula K , et al. (n.d.). Haemodynamic and hormonal responses to heat exposure in a Finnish sauna bath. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from
9) Laatikainen T , et al. (n.d.). Response of plasma endorphins, prolactin and catecholamines in women to intense heat in a sauna. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from
10) Running enhances neurogenesis, learning, and long-term potentiation in mice. (9, November). Retrieved from /

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