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Why Athletes Need More Potassium

Why Athletes Need More Potassium

Why Athletes Need More Potassium

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Why Athletes Need More Potassium

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Potassium is an important key to boosting your energy, endurance, and strength.

Talk to a Dr. Berg Keto Consultant today and get the help you need on your journey. Call 1-540-299-1556 with your questions about Keto, Intermittent Fasting or the use of Dr. Berg products. Consultants are available Monday through Friday from 8 am to 10 pm EST. Saturday & Sunday from 9 am to 6 pm EST. USA Only.

Timestamps
0:00 Introduction: why athletes need more potassium
0:10 What is the sodium-potassium pump?
0:58 Try this experiment
1:22 How to increase your potassium level naturally
2:24 Seeing results? Share your success story!

In this video, we’re going to talk about why athletes need more potassium in their diet.

Your body has something called the sodium-potassium pump in each of your cells. This pump helps maintain the electrical gradient of the cell, keeping potassium inside the cell and sodium outside the cell.

Essentially, it helps keep your cells charged up. Your cells act like batteries that activate nerves and muscles.

If you’re deficient in potassium, you will feel weaker because your muscles won’t be able to relax and contract as well as they need to. This can lower your endurance and performance as an athlete.

A lot of the focus of sports health is on sodium. However, you need about twice the amount of potassium as you do sodium.

Try adding more greens and potassium-rich foods to your diet over a couple of days. Observe how much energy, strength, endurance, and muscle tone you have during your workouts. Then, restrict your potassium intake and notice what happens to your strength.

I’m willing to bet that you’ll feel a significant difference between having plenty of potassium and having not enough potassium.

There are two ways to help improve your potassium level. The first is to increase your potassium intake by eating plenty of healthy vegetables or taking supplements. The second is to avoid foods that deplete potassium.

Refined carbohydrates and sugars can deplete the potassium in your body.

When done right, the Healthy Keto diet is a great tool for maintaining healthy nutrient levels. However, as you first start keto, you can experience a drop in potassium levels due to losing body fat. Stored glucose contains water and electrolytes, which is why losing weight can deplete your body of potassium. You can use an electrolyte powder to help combat these effects.

Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio:
Dr. Berg, age 56, is a chiropractor who specializes in Healthy Ketosis & Intermittent Fasting. He is the author of the best-selling book The Healthy Keto Plan, and is the Director of Dr. Berg Nutritionals. He no longer practices, but focuses on health education through social media.

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Disclaimer:
Dr. Eric Berg received his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic in 1988. His use of “doctor” or “Dr.” in relation to himself solely refers to that degree. Dr. Berg is a licensed chiropractor in Virginia, California, and Louisiana, but he no longer practices chiropractic in any state and does not see patients so he can focus on educating people as a full time activity, yet he maintains an active license. This video is for general informational purposes only. It should not be used to self-diagnose and it is not a substitute for a medical exam, cure, treatment, diagnosis, and prescription or recommendation. It does not create a doctor-patient relationship between Dr. Berg and you. You should not make any change in your health regimen or diet before first consulting a physician and obtaining a medical exam, diagnosis, and recommendation. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. The Health & Wellness, Dr. Berg Nutritionals and Dr. Eric Berg, D.C. are not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information, services or product you obtain through this video or site.

#keto #ketodiet #weightloss

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Best Nutrients for Runners

Best Nutrients for Runners

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Best Nutrients for Runners

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Talk to a Dr. Berg Keto Consultant today and get the help you need on your journey. Call 1-540-299-1556 with your questions about Keto, Intermittent Fasting or the use of Dr. Berg products. Consultants are available Monday through Friday from 8 am to 10 pm EST. Saturday & Sunday from 9 am to 6 pm EST. USA Only.

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Check out the best supplements for runners to help increase energy, boost performance, and more!

Timestamps
0:00 Best supplements for runners – #1
0:35 Best supplements for runners – #2
1:25 Best supplements for runners – #3
1:57 Best supplements for runners – #4
2:25 Best supplements for runners – #5
3:15 Best supplements for runners – #6
3:35 Best supplements for runners – #7
4:03Best supplements for runners – #8
4:23 Best supplements for runners – #9

Today I’m going to cover the best supplements for runners.

1. Magnesium
One of the first symptoms of a magnesium deficiency is getting tired easily when exercising.

2. Vitamin B12
Exercise depletes vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 has a lot to do with making red blood cells, which help you carry oxygen. Vitamin B12 is also involved in nerve-muscle interaction.

3. Green tea
Green tea has a lot of antioxidants and phytonutrients to help get rid of the oxidation and free radical damage from exercise. This can help with recovery. Green tea can also increase fat oxidation and promote better performance.

4. Probiotics
Probiotics may help with recovery. Probiotics can also help decrease the risk of getting an infection from exercising too much.

5. Potassium
If you’re deficient in potassium, you could have problems with cramping and muscle fatigue. It’s also very important for the cardiovascular system and to help keep the arteries flexible and soft.

6. Sodium
Without sodium, your muscles can get weak. I believe the best source of sodium is Himalayan sea salt.

7. Beta-alanine
This can help decrease lactic acid, which can fatigue the muscles. It can decrease acidity, which can cause tiredness. It can also increase energy.

8. Vitamin D
Vitamin D is a powerful anti-inflammatory, and it may have a direct effect on exercise performance. It’s also vital for the cardiovascular part of the body.

9. Vitamin B1
Without enough vitamin B1, you’re not going to be burning your fuel that well. This could cause you to be tired.

Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio:
Dr. Berg, age 55, is a chiropractor who specializes in Healthy Ketosis & Intermittent Fasting. He is the author of the best-selling book The Healthy Keto Plan, and is the Director of Dr. Berg Nutritionals. He no longer practices, but focuses on health education through social media.

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Disclaimer:
Dr. Eric Berg received his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic in 1988. His use of “doctor” or “Dr.” in relation to himself solely refers to that degree. Dr. Berg is a licensed chiropractor in Virginia, California, and Louisiana, but he no longer practices chiropractic in any state and does not see patients so he can focus on educating people as a full time activity, yet he maintains an active license. This video is for general informational purposes only. It should not be used to self-diagnose and it is not a substitute for a medical exam, cure, treatment, diagnosis, and prescription or recommendation. It does not create a doctor-patient relationship between Dr. Berg and you. You should not make any change in your health regimen or diet before first consulting a physician and obtaining a medical exam, diagnosis, and recommendation. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. The Health & Wellness, Dr. Berg Nutritionals and Dr. Eric Berg, D.C. are not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information, services or product you obtain through this video or site.

#keto #ketodiet #weightloss

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Improve Endurance and VO2 Max with Periodic Low Carb

Improve Endurance and VO2 Max with Periodic Low Carb

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utilizing periodic intermittent fasting or low carb ketogenic diets for endurance work is really cool stuff there’s a lot of very compelling research out there surrounding we’re going to cover it in this video plus i’m going to give you some simple tips that you can utilize to get the most out of your endurance work or your endurance competition so we’ll have some fun with it now originally this video was going to be created to talk about vo2 max and how a low carb high fat diet affects your vo2 max but upon diving into the research more i realized that the studies that talk about low carb and vo2 max are a little bit confusing and they ultimately drive you in a big circle and i’ll explain why because i still think it’s imperative to share that data anyhow we’re going to have some fun with this hey if you like this kind of content if you’re into low carb you’re into intermittent fasting i think you’re going to love this channel so please do hit that red subscribe button and then please hit that bell icon select all notifications so you never miss our daily videos then after this video please check out thrive market down below in the description big thank you to thrive market for supporting this channel they’re an online membership-based grocery store so you can get all your keto goods all your intermittent fasting goods i have grocery boxes with thrive markets that means it’s like you’re going grocery shopping with me where i could show you what to get et cetera et cetera i’ve created bundles and boxes that way so highly recommend you check them out special link down below in the description after we get through this content okay so the first thing i want to touch on is there was this landmark study that was published in the journal f-a-s-e-b okay and what it discovered was that ketones increased the hydraulic power of the heart by 25 percent now at first glance this sounds so unbelievably cool if we increase the cardiac hydraulic power that means we have 25 percent more blood that we’re pushing through the body and therefore can improve our vo2 max and it sounds like it sounds like we’ve got the world by the tail when we look at this study but then you look a little deeper ketones were used as a buffer along with glucose and if they’re used as a buffer it means that you’re not really getting the benefit from the ketones you’re getting the benefit from the fact that it’s a buffer in fact when they added insulin as a buffer instead of ketones there was the exact same 25 increase so it’s easy to cherry pick and say oh look cardiac output increases or cardiac hydraulic power increases but that’s not really the case however there was something really really really interesting with the study it found that when you combined insulin along with ketones there was an increase of 36 percent in cardiac efficiency now the problem is you can’t naturally ever combine insulin and ketones you can’t consume carbohydrates and consume fats and create ketones and have an insulin spike at the same time it’s just impossible however there’s some really interesting research that some universities are looking at right now with the use of exogenous ketones and the use of ketone esters so you can get the benefits of ketones along with carbohydrates you do have that insulin ketone combination anyway we’re going to save that for another day when a lot of that research comes out the point is there’s going to be some cool stuff in the future with ketones and athletes so let’s jump back to vo2 max for a second there was one study that showed that the ketogenic diet improves vo2 max quite significantly but when you start looking into the data again you see oh well the subject lost a lot of weight okay vo2 max that number that figure that data is largely associated with the weight okay if you decrease your body mass then your vo2 max gonna go up because it’s related it’s relative to your weight okay and since keto triggers weight loss which by the way is very very good for endurance athletes it’s going to skew the data with vo2 max so yes people are losing weight and relatively speaking their vo2 max is better but let’s not really go there we can’t really use that study the thing is vo2 max is largely anaerobic so vo2 max is associated with more high intense aerobic work or shouldn’t even say aerobic but high intense cardiac work right sprinting or rowing or something like that and most people know that the ketogenic diet is not the best for that highly anaerobic activity and vo2 max is associated a good vo2 max associated with high anaerobic threshold so let’s kind of throw that aside and not worry about it because we’re looking at endurance and vo2 max doesn’t matter as much so there’s a study that’s published in the journal metabolism this is where things get really cool okay it demonstrated between looking at high carb regular high carb athletes alongside keto adapted fat adapted athletes and these were runners right it’s a long distance athletes okay they found that the ketogenic group utilize 2.3 times more fat as a fuel source during their endurance work than the high carb group okay fat burns cleaner okay it has less overall oxidative stress on the body so you can recover faster less overall lactate uh buildup overall it’s just a better fuel for endurance work okay here’s the thing though the really interesting part of this study was that the group that was eating the carbohydrates ended up no longer using fat for fuel once they got above 54.9 percent of their max intensity whereas the keto group was able to maintain fat utilization all the way up to 70.3 of their max intensity what that means is that you’re going to get the better effect utilizing fats during endurance work it’s the way that it works so if you can run or move at a higher intensity at a faster speed and still maintain fats as your fuel source before crossing into the carb territory that’s a big benefit so if you have group a that is basically stuck at 55 percent because once they go over 55 they start utilizing carbs and you have group b that’s on keto that can go up to 70 before they start using carbs do the math of who’s going to be able to go faster for longer okay because they’re never having to tap into their glycogen stores as much they’ve got plenty of fat so the ketogenic diet works tremendously well for aerobic activity but here’s where things get kind of interesting though okay you can have the best of both worlds if you allow yourself to get keto adapted and there’s not a lot of research out there on this yet because i don’t think they’ve cared to look but metabolic flexibility is where it’s at the mitochondria the powerhouse within our cell functions the best when it’s very clearly either using carbs or using fats the gray area is no fun the gray area between carbs and fats the mitochondria has antagonistic signaling pathways that are just fighting do i go fats do i go carbs do i go fast wiggle carbs if you develop the ability to be metabolically flexible your body can shift between oh i’m burning glucose at this time or oh i’m burning fats at this time perfect example you’re going for a run on a straight flat piece of ground and then all of a sudden you hit a hill you hit that hill you go anaerobic you start tapping into carbohydrates if you’re metabolically flexible your body will shift gears it’ll be a seamless switch of the gears think of it like this for a second you have a train track and that train track has a fork in it and you know those little doubly boops that they use to like shift the train to go to one track or the other imagine that that little shifter thing is working so smoothly it’s got plenty of wd-40 plenty of grease and it just goes i’m burning fats booms burning carbs makes it nice and smooth okay now imagine that you’re not metabolically flexible it’s more like this it might get stuck in the middle and the train might fall off the rails and derail and just whatever you see my point and it’s quite virtually just like that it’s pretty simple we need our body to be fat adapted the best way that you can do that is via fasting versus the ketogenic diet the ketogenic diet is great for endurance please don’t get me wrong i highly recommend you do it but i do think that arguably longer fasts and doing your endurance work at the tail end of fasts could get you more metabolically flexible because that way your body is conditioned to use your own stored tissue and then when you do eat you can eat carbohydrates and your body still understands glucose metabolism and doesn’t become glucose intolerant so ketogenic diet for the most part but yeah play around with fasting and implementation of carbs at the end of a fast i can do more on that if you’re interested feel free to comment down below and let me know if you want to see that kind of content another fun thing that i recommend is i did a video on these green tea matcha fat bombs and these are a perfect endurance snack okay because you’re using coconut oil mct you’re using matcha green tea and the green tea has a double effect it’s anti-inflammatory so it’s going to keep inflammation a little bit lower while you’re doing a long endurance work but it’s also going to have the caffeine which can help mobilize fatty acids and stimulate lipolysis so therefore end up helping the fat get into the bloodstream so it can burn easier and then of course you have the ketones or the fats excuse me that are going to help generate ketones that are fairly easy to digest i’ll link up to that video so you can check it out because it’s pretty straightforward anyhow as always thank you for keeping it locked in don’t forget to check out thrive market who’s a big supporter of this channel down below and i’ll see you tomorrow

This Post Was All About Improve Endurance and VO2 Max with Periodic Low Carb.
Improve Endurance and VO2 Max with Periodic Low Carb

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Questions that will be answered within this video:

– What determines VO2 max?
– What’s the effect of ketones on heart power?
– How does a keto diet affect VO2 max?
– What do the studies show in regards to keto & endurance work (and in divers)?

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4113752/
https://www.sciencedirect.com/user/identity/landing?code=hFXMDHPQ2ymHfu0dx1MYGqO3PmhZNBPUbncWSIFB&state=retryCounter%3D0%26csrfToken%3D9dafc6f0-c3f3-405f-93a9-3bfe421f7374%26idpPolicy%3Durn%253Acom%253Aelsevier%253Aidp%253Apolicy%253Aproduct%253Ainst_assoc%26returnUrl%3D%252Fscience%252Farticle%252Fpii%252FS0026049515003340%26uuid%3Dd2472d0e-937b-42c6-a079-5dab8ac3861f%26prompt%3Dnone%26cid%3Darp-a8795b46-06a6-4b0e-8eb0-b4b0f1c395f4
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25275931/
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3392207/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1250269/

https://physoc.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.14814/phy2.13961#phy213961-bib-0012

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Endurance Exercise Can Damage Your Heart

Endurance Exercise Can Damage Your Heart

Endurance Exercise Can Damage Your Heart

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Endurance Exercise Can Damage Your Heart

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Here’s how endurance exercise could actually damage your heart.

The Haywire Heart Book:

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Timestamps:
0:00 Endurance exercise and the heart 
0:20 What endurance exercise does to the heart 
1:40 the problems with endurance exercise
2:52 What you could do
 
Today we’re going to talk about endurance exercise and your heart. If you do endurance exercise, you need to get the book “The Haywire Heart” by Chris Case and John Mandrola. 

About one-third of marathoners experience dilated ventricles. It seems that many athletes develop dilated ventricles or enlarged ventricles on one side. There are even indications of heart muscle damage and cardiac fibrosis. Another problem that can occur is called ventricular tachycardia. 

The authors talk about how doing sustained endurance exercise for over 1 hour every day, five days a week, could cause issues. This could cause structural and functional changes within the heart.  

The heart is becoming stronger and more efficient, and the heart rate actually comes down. The heart rate can even come down from a normal heart rate of around 72 to 50 or even down to 30. The heart doesn’t have to work that hard, so everything is very slow. 

What can happen:
• Low heart rate 
• You can get cardiomegaly/hypertrophy (the heart can get bigger)
• Extra beats (PAC or PVC)

What you could do:
• Cut back on the exercise 
• Try interval training 

Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio:
Dr. Berg, age 55, is a chiropractor who specializes in Healthy Ketosis & Intermittent Fasting. He is the author of the best-selling book The Healthy Keto Plan, and is the Director of Dr. Berg Nutritionals. He no longer practices, but focuses on health education through social media.

DR. BERG’S SHOP:

Follow us on FACEBOOK: fb.me/DrEricBerg

Send a Message to his team: m.me/DrEricBerg

ABOUT DR. BERG:

Disclaimer:
Dr. Eric Berg received his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic in 1988. His use of “doctor” or “Dr.” in relation to himself solely refers to that degree. Dr. Berg is a licensed chiropractor in Virginia, California, and Louisiana, but he no longer practices chiropractic in any state and does not see patients so he can focus on educating people as a full time activity, yet he maintains an active license. This video is for general informational purposes only. It should not be used to self-diagnose and it is not a substitute for a medical exam, cure, treatment, diagnosis, and prescription or recommendation. It does not create a doctor-patient relationship between Dr. Berg and you. You should not make any change in your health regimen or diet before first consulting a physician and obtaining a medical exam, diagnosis, and recommendation. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. The Health & Wellness, Dr. Berg Nutritionals and Dr. Eric Berg, D.C. are not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information, services or product you obtain through this video or site.

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Cardio on a Keto Diet – Cardio Just Got Easier (Endurance)

Cardio on a Keto Diet – Cardio Just Got Easier (Endurance)

Cardio on a Keto Diet – Cardio Just Got Easier (Endurance)

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Cardio on a Keto Diet - Cardio Just Got Easier (Endurance)

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Fuel your Cardio with MY Price on FBOMB’s Fat Bombs:

Cardio on a Keto Diet | Burn Fat and Carbs for Fuel | Endurance Training- Thomas DeLauer…

Fat Oxidation & Glycogen Sparing Effect:
Study – published in the journal Metabolism- The study looked at 20 ultra-marathoners and ironman distance triathletes age 21-45 who were top competitors in running events of 50 kilometers (31 miles) or more.
*Specifically looked at the metabolic effects of keto vs high carb for endurance*
One group consumed a traditional high-carb diet, and the other a low-carb diet for an average of 20 months. On day one, the athletes ran on a treadmill to determine their maximum oxygen consumption and peak fat-burning rates. On day two, the athletes ran on a treadmill for three hours at an intensity equal to 64% of their maximum oxygen capacity. During this test, they drank water but took in no nutrition – before the run, athletes consumed either low- or high-carb nutrition shakes consisting of about 340 calories.

Findings:
On average, the low-carb runners’ peak fat-burning rate was 2.3-fold higher than the rate for high-carb athletes: 1.5 versus .67 grams per minute. And the average contribution of fat during exercise in the low-carb and high-carb groups was 88% and 56%, respectively.

Another key finding:
Despite their low intake of carbs, these fat-burning athletes had normal muscle glycogen levels at rest.
They also broke down roughly the same level of glycogen as the high-carb runners during the long run, and synthesized the same amount of glycogen in their muscles during recovery as the high-carb athletes.

Glycogen Sparing Effect:
There were no differences in pre-exercise muscle glycogen concentrations, the rate of glycogen utilization during exercise, and the rate of glycogen synthesis during recovery. Proves that chronic keto-adaptation in elite ultra-endurance athletes is associated with a robust capacity to increase fat oxidation during exercise while maintaining normal skeletal muscle glycogen concentrations. It’s believed that lactate and/or glycerol, which were two-fold higher at the end of exercise in low carb athletes (and then sharply decreased during recovery), may have provided a source of carbons for glycogen synthesis during recovery.

Fat Oxidation & Performance:
Published in the Journal of Physiology, researchers investigated the effects of adaptation to a ketogenic low carbohydrate (CHO), high fat diet (LCHF) during 3 weeks of intensified training on metabolism and performance of world‐class endurance athletes (21 subjects) – subjects were “elite race walkers.”

They were broken up into three groups:
High carb (HCHO): 60-65% carbohydrate, 15-20% protein, 20% fat.

Periodized carb (PCHO): Same overall dietary breakdown, but spread out differently from day to day so that food intake matched the needs of specific training sessions, and with some workouts performed with deliberately low carb levels in the body. Low-carb, high fat (LCHF): 75-80% fat, 15-20% protein, less than 50 grams per day of carbohydrate in order to be in ketosis. Subjects did a 3-day test block consisting of: walking economy, 10km race, and 25km walk. Fat versus carb usage during a 25K walk after the three-week interventions – findings:

Fat Oxidation:
For the high-carb and periodized-carb groups, nothing really changed, but for the low-carb group, there was a dramatic difference. The “after” data showed a massive decrease in carb usage, balanced by a massive increase in fat usage. In fact, the fat-adapted athletes were able to sustain a fat-burning rate of 1.57 grams of fat per minute, which is 2.5 times greater than their “normal” values.

Performance:
All three groups increased their VO2max during the three-week period of intense training, so you would expect to see faster races times. And sure enough, both high-carb groups improved, by an average of 190 and 124 seconds, respectively. In the LCHF group, on the other hand, the gains in VO2max were countered by the decrease in efficiency. The result was no change in race time (they were 23 seconds slower, on average, a difference that wasn’t statistically significant).

References:
1) Metabolic characteristics of keto-adapted ultra-endurance runners. (n.d.). Retrieved from
2) Low carbohydrate, high fat diet impairs exercise economy and negates the performance benefit from intensified training in elite race walkers – Burke – 2017 – The Journal of Physiology – Wiley Online Library. (2016). Retrieved from
3) Yeo WK , et al. (n.d.). Fat adaptation in well-trained athletes: effects on cell metabolism. – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from 4

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